Ubik

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G.K. Hall, 2001 - Fiction - 301 pages
Glen Runciter's anti-psi security agency hires out its talents to block telepathic and paranormal crimes. But when its special team tackles a big job on the moon, something goes terribly wrong, and Runciter is seemingly killed. Now, his mourning employees are receiving bewildering messages from their boss on toilet walls, traffic tickets, product labels, and even U.S. coins.

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User Review  - DinadansFriend - www.librarything.com

The nature of reality, our use of religion, industrial espionage, and a glimpse of PTSD, are mixed into a drifting story that emphasizes treacher. One of Dick's better pieces but not a movie script idea. Read full review

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User Review  - michaeladams1979 - www.librarything.com

So many weird concepts in this one. Another gnostic-reality classic. I think my second favorite PKD novel of the ones ۪ve read after The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch Read full review

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About the author (2001)

Phillip Kindred Dick was an American science fiction writer best known for his psychological portrayals of characters trapped in illusory environments. Born in Chicago, Illinois, on December 16, 1928, Dick worked in radio and studied briefly at the University of California at Berkeley before embarking on his writing career. His first novel, Solar Lottery, was published in 1955. In 1963, Dick won the Hugo Award for his novel, The Man in the High Castle. He also wrote a series of futuristic tales about artificial creatures on the loose; notable of these was Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, which was later adapted into film as Blade Runner. Dick also published several collections of short stories. He died of a stroke in Santa Ana, California, in 1982.

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