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N' LXXV. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1750.

DILIGITUR NEMO, NISI CUI FORTUNA SECUNDA EST,
QUÆ, SIMUL INTONVIT, PROXIMA QUÆQUE FUGAT.

OVID,

WHEN SMILING FORTUNE SPREADS HER GOLDEN RAY,
ALL CROUD AROUND TO FLATTER AND OBEY
BUT WHEN SHE THUNDERS FROM AN ANGRY SKY,
OUR FRIENDS, OUR FLATTERERS, OUR LOVERS FLY.

Miss A. W.

species of men whom the ladies geneTO THE RAMBLER.

raily mention with terror and aversion SIR,

under the name of Scholars, but whom He diligence with which you en I have found a harmless and inoffensive 1 deavour to cultivate the knowledge order of beings, not so much wiler than of nature, manners, and life, will per- ourselves, but that they may receive as haps incline you to pay fome regard to well as communicate knowledge, and the observations of one who has been more inclined to degrade their own chataught to know mankind by unwelcome racter by cowardly submission, than to information, and whose opinions are the overbear or oppreis us with their learnresult, not of folitary conjectures, but of ing or their wit. practice and experience.

From these men, however, if they are I was born to a large fortune, and bred by kind treatinent encouraged to talk, to the knowledge of those arts which are something may be gained, which, embela supposed to accomplish the mind, and lined with elegancy, and softened by adorn the person of a woman. To these modesty, will always add dignity anit attainmenis, which custom and educa. value to female converiation; and froin tion almost forced upon me, I added my acquaintance with the bookis part fome voluntary acquisitions by the use of the world I derived many principles of books, and the conversation of that of judgment and maxims of prudence,

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N° LXXVI. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1750.

SILVIS UDI PASSIM
PALANTES ERROR CERTO DE TRAMITE PELLIT,
ILLE SINISTRORSUM, HIC DEXTRORSUM ABIT, UUS VTRIQUE
ERROR, SED VARIIS ILLUDIT PARTIBUS.

Hor.

WHILE MAZY ERROR DRAWS MANKIND ASTRAY
FROM TRUTH'S SURE PATH, EACH TAKES HIS DEVIOUS WAY;
ONE TO THE RIGHT, ONE TO THE LEFT RECEDES,
ALIKE DELUDED AS EACH FANCY LL.DS.

LPHINSTON.

JT is easy for every man, whatever tion. When their hearts are burthened

I be his character with others, to find with the coníciousness of a crime, inreafuns for efteeining himself; and there- ftead of seeking for some remedy within fore censure, contempt, or conviction of themselves, they look round upon the crimes, feldom deprive him of his own rest of mankind, to find others tainted favour. Thote, indeed, who can see only with the same guilt: they please themexternal facts, may look upon liim with felves with obierving, that they have abhorrence; but when he calls himself numbers on their fide; and that, though to his own tribunal, he finds every fault, they are hunted out from the society of if not absolutely effaced, yet so much good men, they are not likely to be conpalliated by the goodness of his inten- demned to folitude. tion, and the cogency of the motive, It may be oblerved, perhaps without that very little guilt or turpitude re exception, that none are so industrious mains; and when he takes a survey of to detect wickedness, or so ready to imthe whole complication of his character, pute it, as they whole crimes are aphe discovers so many latent excellencies, parent and confefied. They envy an fo inany virtues that want but an op- unblunished reputation, and what they portunity to exert themselves in act, envy they are busy to defroy: they are and so many kind wishes for universal unwilling to suppose themselves meaner, happiness, that he looks on himself as and more corrupt than others; and theresuffering unjustly under the infamy of fore willingly pull down from their elesingle failings, while the general tem- vations thore with whom they cannot rise per of his mind is unknown or unre. to an equality. No man yet was ever garded.

wicked without secret discontent; and, It is natural to mean well, when only according to the different degrees of reabstracted ideas of virtue are proposed maining virtue, or unextinguished rea. to the mind, and no particular patlion fori, he either endeavours to ritorm himturns us atide from rectitude; and 10 felt, or corrupt others; either to regain willing is every man to flatter himfill, the itation which he has quitted, or prethat the difference between approving vail on others to imitate his defection. · laws, and obeying them, is frequently It has always been contidered as an - forgotten; he that acknowledges the alleviation of mitery not to suffer alone, obligations of inorality, and pleates his even when union and society can convanity with enforcing them to others, tribute nothing to resistance or escape; concludes himself zenlous in the cause some comfort of the firme kind secins of Virtue, though he has no longer any to incite wickelness to fuck associates; regard to her precepts, than they con- though, indeed, another rcaton may be form to his own defires; and counts given, for as guilt is propagatid, the himself among her warıneft lovers, be- power of reproach is diminished, and canle he prziies her beauty, though every amonyounibers equally detestable, cvery rival itcals away his heart.

individual may be theltered from thamie, There are, however, great numbers though not from conscience. who have little recourte to the retine- Another lenitive by which the throbs ngots of penati put who yet live of the breast are afunged, is the con. a pace with them .'s, by means which teinplation, not of the fame, but of difroguire lets undertanding, or leis attcn- ferent crimes. He thai cannot justify

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