Dissertations Moral and Critical, Volume 1

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Mess. Exshaw, Walker, Beatty, White, Byrne, Cash, and M'Kenzie, 1783 - Aesthetics
 

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Page 334 - Rise up, my love, my fair one, and come away. For, lo, the winter is past, The rain is over and gone ; The flowers appear on the earth ; The time of the singing of birds is come, And the voice of the turtle is heard in our land ; The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, And the vines with the tender grape give a good smell. Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
Page 188 - The ways of heaven are dark and intricate, Puzzled in mazes, and perplex'd with errors : Our understanding traces them in vain, Lost and bewilder'd in the fruitless search : Nor sees with how much art the windings run, Nor where the regular confusion ends.
Page 392 - Earth trembled from her entrails, as again In pangs ; and Nature gave a second groan ; Sky lour'd, and, muttering thunder, some sad drops Wept at completing of the mortal sin Original...
Page 382 - They looking back, all th' eastern side beheld Of Paradise, so late their happy seat, Wav'd over by that flaming brand, the gate With dreadful faces throng'd and fiery arms...
Page 270 - I was once myself in agonies of grief that are unutterable, and in so great a distraction of mind, that I thought myself even out of the possibility of receiving comfort. The occasion was as follows : When I was a youth, in a part of the army which was then quartered at Dover, I fell in love with an agreeable young woman, of a good family in those parts, and had the satisfaction of seeing my addresses kindly received, which occasioned the perplexity I am going to relate. We were in a calm evening...
Page 270 - In the midst of these our innocent endearments, she snatched a paper of verses out of my hand, and ran away with them. I was following her, when on a...
Page 354 - It is indifferent for judges and magistrates ; for if they be facile and corrupt, you shall have a servant five times worse than a wife. For soldiers, I find the generals, commonly in their hortatives...
Page 213 - So vast is art, so narrow human wit : Not only bounded to peculiar arts, But oft' in those confin'd to single parts.
Page 271 - ... height upon such a range of rocks, as would have dashed her into ten thousand pieces had her body been made of adamant. It is much easier for my reader to imagine my state of mind upon such an occasion than for me to express it. I said to myself, It is not in the power of heaven to relieve me! when I awaked, equally transported and astonished, to see myself drawn out of an affliction which, the very moment before, appeared to me altogether inextricable.
Page 420 - It is one of the great beauties of poetry to make hard things intelligible, and to deliver what is abstruse of itself in such easy language as may be understood by ordinary readers...

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