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" Every reader knows the straight and narrow path as well as he knows a road in which he has gone backward and forward a hundred times. This is the highest miracle of genius, that things which are not should be as though they were, that the imaginations... "
Worthies of the world, a series of historical and critical sketches, ed. by ... - Page 191
edited by - 1880
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The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 54

1831
...that things which are not should be as though they were, — that the imaginations of one mind should become the personal recollections of another. And...turn-stile, with which we are not perfectly acquainted. The wicket gate, and the desolate swamp which separates it from the City of Destruction, — the long line...
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Critical and Miscellaneous Essays, Volume 1

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1840
...— that things which are not should be as though they were, that the imaginations of one mind should become the personal recollections of another. And...turn-stile, with which we are not perfectly acquainted. The wicket gate, and the desolate swamp which separates it from the City of Destruction ; the long line...
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Critical and Miscellaneous Essays, Volume 1

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - Great Britain - 1843
...genius—that things which are not should be as though they were, that the imaginations of one mind should become the personal recollections of another. And...no resting-place, no turn-stile, with which we are riot perfectly acquainted. The wicket gate, and the desolate swamp which separates it from the City...
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The District School Reader, Or, Exercises in Reading and Speaking: Designed ...

William Draper Swan - American literature - 1845 - 484 pages
...— that things which are not should be as though they were, that the imaginations of one mind should become the personal recollections of another. And...turnstile, with which we are not perfectly acquainted. The wicket gate, and the desolate swamp which separates it from the City of Destruction ; the long line...
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Essays, Critical and Miscellaneous

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - English literature - 1846 - 758 pages
...which VOL. I.— 17 are not should be as though they were, that the imaginations of one mind should afflictions of Job than the felicities of Solomon. Prosperity is not without many fears and dist n ascent, no declivity, no resting-place, no turni stile, with which we are not perfectly acquainted....
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Parsing Book: Containing Rules of Syntax, and Models for Analyzing and ...

Allen Hayden Weld - English language - 1848 - 111 pages
...they were, that2 the imaginations of one mind should become the personal recollections of another. 5. And this miracle the tinker has wrought There is no ascent, no declivity, no restmg-place, no turnstile, with which we are not perfectly acquainted. The wicket gate, and the desolate...
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Phrenology Examined, and Shown to be Inconsistent with the Principles of ...

Nathan Lewis Rice - Mesmerism - 1849 - 310 pages
...that things which are not should be as though they were — that the imaginations of one mind should become the personal recollections of another. And this miracle the tinker has wrought. * * * All the stages of the journey, all the forms which cross or overtake the pilgrims — giants...
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The Harbinger, Or, New Magazine of the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion

Theology - 1859
...that things which are not should be as though they were ; that the imaginations of one mind should become the personal recollections of another And this...which separates it from the City of Destruction ; the iron cage ; the house beautiful, &c. ; all are as well known to us as the sight of our own street....
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Critical and Historical Essays: Southey's edition of Pilgrim's Progress ...

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - English literature - 1850
...genius, that things which are not should be as though they were, that the imaginations of one mind should become the personal recollections of another. And...turn-stile, with which we are not perfectly acquainted. The wicket gate, and the desolate swamp which separates it from the City of Destruction, the long line...
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English Literature of the Nineteenth Century ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - English literature - 1851 - 746 pages
...— that things which are not should be as though they were; that the imaginations of one mind should become the personal recollections of another. And...turnstile, with which we are not perfectly acquainted. The wicket gate, and the desolate swamp which separates it from the City of Destruction; the long line...
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