The Forms of Historical Fiction: Sir Walter Scott and His Successors

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Cornell University Press, 1983 - Literary Criticism - 257 pages

Harry Shaw's aim is to promote a fuller understanding of nineteenth-century historical fiction by revealing its formal possibilities and limitations. His wide-ranging book establishes a typology of the ways in which history was used in prose fiction during the nineteenth century, examining major works by Sir Walter Scott--the first modern historical novelist--and by Balzac, Hugo, Anatole France, Eliot, Thackeray, Dickens, and Tolstoy.

 

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Contents

PREFACE
9
A NOTE ON CITATIONS OF SCOTTS WORKS
15
HISTORY AS PASTORAL HISTORY AS A SOURCE OF DRAMA
51
HISTORY AS SUBJECT
100
THE HERO AS INSTRUMENT
150
THE HERO AS SUBJECT
212
INDEX 153
253
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About the author (1983)

Harry E. Shaw is Professor of English at Cornell University. He is the author of Narrating Reality: Austen, Scott, Eliot, also published by Cornell University Press, and coauthor of Reading the Nineteenth-Century Novel: Austen to Eliot.

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