James Hall of Tynemouth: A Beneficent Life of a Busy Man of Business, Volume 2

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Page 221 - Who is God that He should hear us While the rushing of the iron wheels is stirred? When we sob aloud, the human creatures near us Pass by, hearing not, or answer not a word. And we hear not (for the wheels in their resounding) Strangers speaking at the door; Is it likely God, with angels singing round him, Hears our weeping any more? "Two words, indeed, of praying we remember, And at midnight's hour of harm, 'Our Father,' looking upward in the chamber, We say softly for a charm. We know no other...
Page 78 - Tis liberty alone that gives the flower Of fleeting life its lustre and perfume ; And we are weeds without it. All constraint, Except what wisdom lays on evil men, Is evil ; hurts the faculties, impedes Their progress in the road of science ; blinds The eyesight of discovery ; and begets, In those that suffer it a sordid mind, Bestial, a meagre intellect, unfit To be the tenant of man's noble form.
Page 1 - And well may the children weep before you! They are weary ere they run: They have never seen the sunshine, nor the glory Which is brighter than the sun. They know the grief of man without...
Page 109 - He prayeth well, who loveth well Both man and bird and beast. He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.
Page 98 - For forms of government let fools contest: Whate'er is best administer'd is best: For modes of faith, let graceless zealots fight; His can't be wrong whose life is in the right; In faith and hope the world will disagree.
Page 37 - That is found begging or receiving alms (whether actually or under the pretext of selling or offering for sale anything), or being in any street or public place for the purpose of so begging or receiving alms: That is found wandering and not having amy home or settled place of abode, or proper guardianship, or visible means of subsistence...
Page 33 - With eyes severe, and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modern instances ; And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts Into the lean and...
Page 285 - O'er untravelled seas to roam, — Yet lives the blood of England in our veins ! And shall we not proclaim That blood of honest fame, Which no tyranny can tame By its chains...
Page 167 - But here the main skill and groundwork will be to temper them such lectures and explanations upon every opportunity as may lead and draw them in willing obedience, inflamed with the study of learning and the admiration of virtue; stirred up with high hopes of living to be brave men and worthy patriots, dear to God and famous to all ages.

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