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sentiments given to the public by those who have most happily been led to the perception of their error on this point, are also highly interesting. Among them the recent publication of PROFESSOR JEWETT, lately of Marietta College, is peculiarly adapted to produce a favourable effect on the inquirer. But still if there be a volume in general circulation containing the amount of information which should have its place not only in the library, but in the head and heart of every lover of the truth, the author has not been fortunate enough to meet with it.d

Is not the defence and propagation of one important truth especially committed to our charge as a denomination! and ought not the impression to be produced on the public mind, that its members are better informed on all that relates to this topic, than any other body of Chris

So far from deeming the present work uncalled for, the author is fully persuaded that the cause of truth yet demands a much larger work; one which will contain such copious extracts from the writings of the fathers, ecclesiastical historians, reformers, and German critics, as shall put our ministering brethren, and very many of our educated lay brethren, in as happy a situation as to information, for a few dollars, so far as the subject of baptism is concerned, as though they had expended a thousand in the purchase of a library. The author is most happy to be able to state, if indeed he is not taking too great a liberty, that PROFESSOR CHASE, of the department of ecclesiastical history, in Newton Institution, has had for some time a work of this character in preparation. His literary acquirements, and opportunities of research, peculiarly qualify him to lay our denomination under lasting obligations for his labours; and will demand from it a most cordial attestation of their approval and support.

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rally, if not universally, admitted, that immersion was the apostolic mode of baptism, and was the general and authorized practice of the church for ages. In the present improved state of Christian feeling it has, however, been found by the advocates of sprinkling, that this admission was frequently fatal; that the authority of the church to vary the mode of administration, which was formerly a general and sufficient plea, will not avail; young converts will insist on following what is admitted to be the example of their Lord. It is, therefore, though at the imminent risk, to say the least, of moral character, asserted that there is not the least evidence that Christ was immersed, or that the Apostles practised immersion. Indeed the zeal for sprinkling has become so intense as to lead one of its most prominent advocates, high in ecclesiastical station, to make the unheard-of affirmation respecting immersion as practised by John the Baptist, that “there is not the smallest probability that he baptized in this manner!" The same professor of ecclesiastical historyf does not hesitate to affirm “ that the strong arguments in favour of affusion or sprinkling, as the preferable mode, have been duly appreciated in all ages.Is it not necessary that the facts of history should be placed in a condensed and lucid form, in the possession of all willing to receive them, that the disgrace which must necessarily accrue to the bold propagators of such gross misrepresentations, may deter others from similar

Dr. Miller, Professor of Ecclesiastical History in the Theological Seminary at Princeton.

attempts, more injurious indeed to the common character of Christianity than to the particular truth against which they are aimed.

While, however, the author feels fully acquitted of “running before he was sent;" he is very far from thinking that many of his brethren would not have executed this task more to the benefit as well as to the satisfaction of the public. He can only say, with the utmost sincerity, that he has shrunk from no labour or selfdenial which his circumstances could possibly admit; and if much of imperfection is found, (the common lot of humanity at best,) the necessary and justifiable haste occasioned by a protracted absence from his family and his charge, will mitigate the censures of those whose disapprobation would be to him a source of regret.

In the execution of the work, the labours of research have not been light; although, had circumstances admitted, the author would willingly have extended them through the whole mass of the Fathers of the ancient church. For this, however, there was the less necessity, as Dr. Wall, in his large collection, has exercised considerable impartiality, and at any rate afforded abundant matter to answer himself and all his associates. The works of Robinson, GALE, Crosby, Gill, Booth, RIPLEY, Judd, and the articles of PROFESSOR SEARs in the Christian Review, have been sources of important

& The denomination cannot be too zealous for the maintenance of this most valuable periodical. Under its present acute and talented editor, it not only fertilizes by its oft flowing stream of knowledge, but is also a work of defence against the assaults of error.

aid in the compilation of this volume. But the author is no less indebted to DODDRIDGE, MACKNIGHT, WALL, Bingham, and others of the advocates of pædobaptism ; many valuable facts and opinions favourable to the truth are to be found in their writings. The author would rejoice could he say as much respecting the Lectures of Dr. Woods and Dr. MILLER, the professors of Andover and Princeton. The former, indeed, for these days, is a work of comparative candour and consideraable regard to historic truth, though its omissions of facts are unaccountable; but the latter evades the truth at every point, as though it were the Doctor's bitterest enemy! Should any of the students of either of these theological institutions cast their eyes on these pages, the author would suggest to them the propriety of giving the Lectures of the learned and amiable Dr. Doddridge, (one of the best biblical critics, as well as one of the most pious men his age produced,) a careful perusal, and then, for the purpose of instituting a comparison between the candour of the past age, and the blind zeal of the present, read Dr. Miller's Lectures as soon after as convenient."

h The author would not be considered as including the whole mass of pædobaptists in this implied censure ;—there are many gratifying exceptions, especially among congregationalists and episcopalians. Among the latter, an eminent instance has recently occurred, in the bold and candid avowal of BishOP Smith, of Kentucky, who publicly affirms that, after the most careful investigation, and mature reflection, he considers immersion to be the only apostolic mode of baptism; and recommends the church of which he is attempts, more injurious indeed to the common character of Christianity than to the particular truth against which they are aimed.

While, however, the author feels fully acquitted of “running before he was sent;" he is very far from thinking that many of his brethren would not have executed this task more to the benefit as well as to the satisfaction of the public. He can only say, with the utmost sincerity, that he has shrunk from no labour or selfdenial which his circumstances could possibly admit; and if much of imperfection is found, (the common lot of humanity at best,) the necessary and justifiable haste occasioned by a protracted absence from his family and his charge, will mitigate the censures of those whose disapprobation would be to him a source of regret.

In the execution of the work, the labours of research have not been light; although, had circumstances admitted, the author would willingly have extended them through the whole mass of the Fathers of the ancient church. For this, however, there was the less necessity, as Dr. Wall, in his large collection, has exercised considerable impartiality, and at any rate afforded abundant matter to answer himself and all his associates. The works of Robinson, GALE, CROSBY, Gill, Booth, RIPLEY, JUDD, and the articles of PROFESSOR SEARS in the Christian Review,s have been sources of important

6 The denomination cannot be too zealous for the maintenance of this most valuable periodical. Under its present acute and talented editor, it not only fertilizes by its oft flowing stream of knowledge, but is also a work of defence against the assaults of error.

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