Thoughts on the present state of the British West India colonies, and on measures for their improvement, tending to the extinction of the African slave trade

Front Cover
P. Richardson, 1840 - Social Science - 54 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - That, through a determined and persevering, but at the same time judicious and temperate, enforcement of such measures, this House looks forward to a progressive improvement in the character of the slave population, such as may prepare them for a participation in those civil rights and privileges...
Page 11 - That this House is anxious for the accomplishment of this purpose, at the earliest period that shall be compatible with the well-being of the slaves themselves, with the safety of the colonies, and with a fair and equitable consideration of the interests of private property.
Page 9 - That through a determined and persevering, but at the same time judicious and temperate, enforcement of such measures, this House looks forward to a progressive improvement in the character of the slave population, such as may prepare them for a participation in those civil rights and privileges which are enjoyed by other classes of his Majesty's subjects.
Page 17 - Commons to move for the appointment of a committee to inquire into the working of the apprenticeship system in the Colonies, the condition of the apprentices, and the laws and regulations respecting them.
Page 50 - Nor, let me observe, were the damage to end here, would the British Government have any cause to feel disappointment.. Carrying into effect the religious and benevolent views of the nation at large, it was their object to convert slaves into free men ; to rescue their brethren of Africa from the lash of compulsory toil, and establish them as Christian men on the soil where they had been transported as chattels or beasts of burden. On this, the principal question of all, there is, I am happy to say,...
Page 18 - Under these circumstances, your committee feel bound to express their conviction that nothing could bo more unfavourable than any occurrence which had a tendency to unsettle the minds of either class, with regard to the fixed determination of the Imperial Parliament, to preserve inviolate both parts of the solemn engagement by which the services of the apprenticed labourer were secured to his employer for a definite period, and under specified restrictions, at the expiration of which, he is to be...
Page 20 - An Act for punishing Mutiny and Desertion, and for the better Payment of the Army and their Quarters. An Act for the Regulation of Her Majesty's Royal Marine Forces while on Shore. An Act to amend the Act for the Abolition of Slavery in the British Colonies.
Page 12 - ... which it is impossible for any person, the most careless, to look with indifference, but which any man, who approaches it as a subject of legislation, must view with the deepest awe — it is the question now before us. To speak of the difficulties which encompass it, as compared with almost any other question which has ever occupied the attention of parliament, would be to draw but a faint and feeble picture of those difficulties...
Page 18 - ... occurrence which had a tendency to unsettle the minds of either class, with regard to the fixed determination of the Imperial Parliament to preserve inviolate both parts of the solemn engagement, by which the services of the Apprenticed Labourer were secured to his employer for a definite period and under specified restrictions, at the expiration of which he is to be raised to a state of unqualified freedom, and be governed by laws framed in all respects on the same principle as those to which...
Page 21 - Court against a justice for anything done by him in the execution of his office...

Bibliographic information