Report and Transactions - The Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Literature and Art, Volume 14

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Page 366 - THE poetry of earth is never dead: When all the birds are faint with the hot sun, And hide in cooling trees, a voice will run From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead ; That is the Grasshopper's — he takes the lead In summer luxury, — he has never done With his delights; for when tired out with fun He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed.
Page 332 - Man free, man working for himself, with choice Of time, and place, and object...
Page 23 - Reprinted from the Transactions of the Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Literature, and Art for with the consent of the Council of the Association...
Page 494 - LÚvite — such was the phrase then in use — might be had for his board, a small garret, and ten pounds a year, and might not only perform his own professional functions, might not only be the most patient of butts and...
Page 58 - ... they intended to be permanent, we have no right to obliterate. What we have ourselves built, we are at liberty to throw down; but what other men gave their strength and wealth and life to accomplish, their right over does not pass away with their death; still less is the right to the use of what they have left vested in us only. It belongs to all their successors.
Page 184 - I, AB, do solemnly and sincerely, in the presence of God, profess, testify, and declare, that I do believe, that, in the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper, there is not any transubstantiation of the elements of bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ, at or after the consecration thereof by any person whatsoever...
Page 594 - That ever he takes in hand; For we are all his servants, And all at his command. Drink, boys, drink, and see you do not spill, For if you do, you must drink two, — it is your master's will. Now our harvest is ended, And supper is past ; Here's our mistress' good health, In a full flowing glass!
Page 58 - I must not leave the truth unstated, that it is again no question of expediency or feeling whether we shall preserve the buildings of past times or not. We have no right whattiver to touch . them. They are not ours. They belong partly to those who built them, and partly to all the generations of mankind who are to follow us.
Page 229 - To all these there be divers witnesses, both Squires and ladies, whose names are engraven upon the stone : this stone is to be sent to a town hard by Exeter, where this happened.
Page 495 - Whiles his young master lieth o'er his head. Second, that he do, on no default, Ever presume to sit above the salt. Third that he never change his trencher twice. Fourth, that he use all common courtesies, Sit bare at meals, and one half rise and wait. Last, that he never his...

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