History of the Wars of the French Revolution, from the Breaking Out of the War, in 1792, to the Restoration of a General Peace in 1815: Comprehending the Civil History of Great Britain and France, During that Period, Volume 2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1818 - Europe
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Page 466 - ... march, had not arrived. We maintained our position also, and completely defeated and repulsed all the enemy's attempts to get possession of it. The enemy repeatedly attacked us with a large body of infantry and cavalry, supported by a numerous and powerful artillery ; he made several charges with the cavalry upon our infantry, but all were repulsed in the steadiest manner.
Page 467 - Bulow, upon the enemy's flank, was a most decisive one; and even if I had not found myself in a situation to make the attack, which produced the final result, it would have forced the enemy to retire, if his attacks should have failed, and would have prevented him from taking advantage of them, if they should unfortunately have succeeded.
Page 342 - Rhine, from the point where it becomes navigable unto the sea, and vice versa, shall be free, so that it can be interdicted to no one: — and at the future Congress, attention shall be paid to the establishment of the principles according to which the Duties to be raised by the States bordering on the Rhine may be regulated, in the mode the most impartial, and the most favourable to the commerce of all Nations.
Page 467 - This attack upon the right of our centre was accompanied by a very heavy cannonade upon our whole line, which' was destined to support the repeated attacks of cavalry and infantry, occasionally mixed, but sometimes separate, which were made upon it, In one of these the enemy carried the...
Page 55 - ... be destined to any port of France, or of her allies, or of any other country at war with his majesty, or to any port or place from which the British flag...
Page 254 - I do declare solemnly before God, that I believe, that no act in itself unjust, immoral, or wicked, can ever be justified or excused by or under pretence or colour, that it was done either for the good of the church, or in obedience to any ecclesiastical power whatsoever.
Page 254 - British empire ; it is highly advisable to provide for the removal of the civil and military disqualifications under which : His Majesty's Roman...
Page 200 - In the critical situation of the war in the peninsula, I shall be most anxious to avoid any measure which can lead my allies to suppose that I mean to depart from the present system. Perseverance alone can achieve the great object in question ; and I cannot withhold my approbation from those who have honourably distinguished themselves in support of it.
Page 53 - His Majesty's principal Secretaries of State, the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, and the Judges of the High Court of Admiralty, and the Courts of Vice-admiralty, are to take the necessary measures herein as to them shall respectively appertain.
Page 364 - After thirty years of peace and prosperity the United States have been driven to arms. The injuries and aggressions, the insults and indignities of Great Britain have once more left them no alternative but manly resistance, or unconditional submission.

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