The route book of Devon

Front Cover
Besley, 1870 - Devon (England) - 380 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 110 - This protection from winds extends over a very considerable tract of beautiful country, abounding in every variety of landscape, so that there is scarcely a wind that blows from which the invalid will not be able to find a shelter for exercise either on foot or horseback.
Page 110 - Clark, in his excellent work on climate, says, "the general character of the climate of this 'coast is soft and humid. Torquay is certainly drier than the other places, and almost entirely 'free from fogs. This drier state of the atmosphere probably arises in part from the limestone rocks, which are confined to the neighbourhood of this place, and partly from its position between the two streams, the Dart and the Teign, by which the rain is in some degree attracted. Torquay is also remarkably protected...
Page 225 - ... which extremity taught him a sudden policy — to put a stone in his cap, and tumble the same into the water, while these rangers were fast at his heels ; who looking down after the noise, and seeing his cap swimming thereon, supposed that he had desperately drowned himself, gave over their further hunting, and left him liberty to shift away, and ship over into Brittany; — for a grateful remembrance of which delivery he afterwards builded in the place of his lurking a chapel.
Page 20 - ... season, north-easterly winds somewhat prevail. The summer is rarely very hot, and though showers are frequent, yet it may be considered a dry season. The winds which blow, for the most part from the north-west, are cooling and refreshing. The evenings and nights, however, are sometimes cold and damp. The autumn is warm, and inclined to be damp and rainy : it is peculiarly the season for the Devonshire drizzle, which is a rain so light as to deposit itself as a thick dew, attended by a grey clouded...
Page 139 - What it was in its antique form can hardly be calculated from what at present remains standing, which is only the front facing the south in a direct line of about sixty cloth-yards in length.
Page 225 - Third ; he was hotly pursued and narrowly searched for, which extremity taught him a sudden policy — to put a stone in his cap, and tumble the same into the water, while these rangers were fast at his heels ; who looking down after the noise, and seeing his cap swimming thereon, supposed that he had desperately drowned himself, gave...
Page 229 - Ethelwold, his minion, to woo her in his behalf, to he dignified with the title of a queen. But, as sometimes it falleth out there is falsehood in fellowship, this earl sued unto her for himself, and that with good liking of her father, so as the king would consent; unto whom he returned this answer : " That the lady came far short of such perfection as fame gave out, and in no ways for feature fit for a king " Whereupon Edgar, mistrusting no double dealing, soon consented, and Orgarius gave his...
Page 139 - What was finished may be thus described: Before the door of the great hall was a noble walk, whose length was the breadth of the court, arched over with curiously carved free-stone, supported in the...
Page 148 - ... arises wildly, and here and there widely scattered, a grove of dwarf oak trees. Their situation, exposed to the bleak winds, which rush past the side of the declivity on which they grow, and through the valley of the Dart at their base (a valley that acts like a tunnel to assist the -fury of the gust), the diminutive height of the trees, their singular and antiquated appearance, all combine to raise feelings of mingled curiosity and wonder. The oaks are not above ten or twelve feet high, so stunted...
Page 128 - T'other day, much in want of a subject for song, Thinks I to myself, I have hit on a strain, Sure marriage is much like a Devonshire lane.

Bibliographic information