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Her cutty sark, o' Paisley harn,
That while a lassie she had worn,
In longitude tho' sorely scanty,
It was her best, and she was vauntie.-
Ah! little kenn'd thy reverend grannie,
That sark she coft for her wee Nannie,
Witwa pund Scots ('twas a' her riches),
Wad ever grac'd a dance of witches!

But here my muse her wing maun cour;
Sic flights are far beyond her pow'r:
To sing how Nannie lap and flang,
(A souple jade she was and strang)
And how Tam stood, like ane bewitch'd,
And thought his very een enrich'd;
Even Satan glowr'd, and fidg'd fu' fain,
And hotch'd and blew wi' might and main :
Till first ae caper, syne anither,
Tam tint his reason a' thegither,
And roars out, “ Weel done, Cutty-sark!"
And in an instant all was dark :
And scarcely had he Maggie rallied,
When out the hellish legion sallied.

As beez bizz out wi' angry fyke, When plundering herds assail their byke; As open pussie's mortal foes, When, pop! she starts before their nose; As eager runs the market-crowd, When “ Catch the thief !” resounds aloud; So Maggie runs, the witches follow, Wi' mony an eldritch skreech and hollow,

Ah, Tam! ah, Tam! thou'll get thy fairin! In hell they'll roast thee like a herrin! In vain thy Kate awaits thy comin! Kate soon will be a woefu' woman! Now, do thy speedy utmost, Meg, And win the key-stane of the brig; There at them thou thy tail may toss, A running stream they dare na cross. But ere the key-stane she could make, The fient a tail she had to shake! For Nannie, far before the rest, Hard upon noble Maggie prest, And flew at Tam wi’ furious ettle ; But little wist she Maggie's mettle Ae spring brought off her master hale, But left behind her ain

grey The carlin claught her by the rump, And left poor Maggie scarce a stump.

tail :

Now, wha this tale o' truth shall read,
Ilk man and mother's son, take heed :
Whene'er to drink you are inclin'd, ,
Or cutty-sarks run in your mind,
Think, ye may buy the joys o’er dear,
Remember Tam o' Shanter's mare.

SONG.

O POORTITH cauld, and restless love,

Ye wreck my peace between ye; Yet poortith a' I could forgive, An' 'twere na for

my Jeanie. O why should fate sic pleasure have,

Life's dearest bands untwining? Or why sae sweet a flower as love,

Depend on Fortune's shining?

This warld's wealth when I think on,

Its pride, and a’ the lave o't ;
Fie, fie on silly coward man,
That he should be the slave o't.

O why, &c.

Her een sae bonnie blue betray,

How she repays my passion; But prudence is her o'erword ay, She talks of rank and fashion.

O why, &c.

O wha can prudence think upon,

And sic a lassie by him ?
O wha can prudence think upon,
And sae in love as I am?

O why, &c.

How blest the humble cotter's fate!

He woos his simple dearie;
The sillie bogles, wealth and state,

Can never make them eerie.
O why should fate sic pleasure have,

Life's dearest bands untwining?
Or why sae sweet a flower as love,

Depend on Fortune's shining?

TO MARY IN HEAVEN.

Thou lingering star, with less'ning ray,

That lov'st to greet the early morn, Again thou usher'st in the day

My Mary from my soul was torn. O Mary! dear departed shade!

Where is thy place of blissful rest? Seest thou thy lover lowly laid ?

Hear'st thou the groans that rend his breast?

That sacred hour can I forget,

Can I forget the hallowed grove, Where by the winding Ayr we met,

To live one day of parting love! Eternity will not efface

Those records dear of transports past; Thy image at our last embrace;

Ah! little thought we 'twas our last !

Ayr gurgling kissed his pebbled shore,

O'erhung with wild woods, thick’ning, green; The fragrant birch, and hawthorn hoar,

Twin'd amorous round the raptured scene. The flowers sprang wanton to be prest,

The birds sang love on every spray, 'Till too, too soon, the glowing west

Proclaim'd the speed of winged day.

Still o'er these scenes my mem'ry wakes,

And fondly broods with miser care; Time but the impression stronger makes,

As streams their channels deeper wear. My Mary, dear departed shade!

Where is thy place of blissful rest? Seest thou thy lover lowly laid ?

Hear'st thou the groans that rend his breast?

SONG.

FAREWELL, thou fair day, thou green earth, and ye

skies, Now gay with the bright setting sun; Farewell loves and friendships, ye dear tender ties,

Our race of existence is run!

Thou grim king of terrors, thou life's gloomy foe,

Go, frighten the coward and slave;

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