Page images
PDF
EPUB

a

cess of combustion. Most of the male sex, nearly all, in Germany, indulge in smoking; and those who don't like tobacco must look out, and shun its fumes if they can, or bear the annoyance as they may be able, if they have not the chance to avoid it. There are carriages provided exclusively for ladies, who may make them their refuge, if willing to be limited to the company of their own sex only; for no gentleman is permitted to intrude himself into those carriages.

Arrived at Heidelberg, we found a large number of carriages in waiting for the accommodation of those who required them, which we did not. Leaving our luggage in charge at the station, we walked along the principal street of the city to the far end, and then mounted the steep hill to the grand old castle, one of the most imposing structures of past ages to be met with in all Europe. It is extensive and grand enough for any potentate ; but its arrangements, of course, do not comport with modern usages and tastes.

It is a strong-hold of tyranny, adapted only for a sovereign tyrant. It contains such a multitude of apartments and passages, that it was, to us, a complete labyrinth, in which we should have been soon lost without a guide. We had to pay the moderate fee of sixpence each for entrance. This included the attendance of a guide-one of the gentler sex, who conducted us all over it. We had a beautiful and extensive prospect from the top of the octagon tower, commanding a full view of the city, the river Neckar, both up and down, and a great length of country in the direction towards Switzerland. Our guide told us the castle was first built by Rudolf, in 1204. The fortification walls are seventeen feet thick. A dungeon was pointed out to us as we passed it on our left, having grooves on each side the entrance, and a slot in the wall above, so as to secure the prisoner or prisoners, by letting down a strong door, as a mouse on taking the bait is secured in a trap by the descent of the door. What a dreadful place of confinement ! And what a devil has man been to man !

A large and beautiful part of the castle, comprising a suit of apartments altogether different from the original fabric, was built in 1612 for the Princess Elizabeth, of England, daughter of our James I., by whom she was given in marriage, early in the following year, to Frederick, the Elector Palatine, whose residence was here. This part of the castle bears the distinctive name of the English part. Gigantic ivy of 200 years' growth now clothes and grasps the walls of one side of the fabric, whilst trees rise from the court below to a great height : one of them, a cherry tree, is seventy feet high, its fruit affording a season-banquet to birds. There are two chapels in the castle: one very old, and long disused; the other not now used, but still retaining its pulpit, pictures, and other ornaments. The old one, after its disuse as a place of worship, came into use as a place for making wine. At a short distance from it, and at a lower elevation, is the wine cellar, containing a tun that held sixty. thousand bottles of wine. Another, still a little lower in level, held nearly 300,000 bottles ! It is

a

a

the largest wine-tun in the world. It has been more than once filled ; but many years have passed since it was used. Over it is a dancing stage, upon which fools cut capers in former times. Drink and dancing seem natural associates. How sad it is that men will abuse what was designed for moderate enjoyment, and not for riotous excess.

When first we entered the castle, we left such articles of clothing and protection as were cumbrous at the door of our guide's residence, near the window at which we had paid our entrance fee. We were invited to put them upon a settle there, and assured that they would be safe ; so there we laid them. On our return to the spot, my daughter's travelling-cloak was missing. It was not of much value, but was very useful on her journeys. No one knew what had become of it. We dare not be positive that we had left it there with our other things; but my daughter believed we had, as did her brother, who had previously carried it up the hill for her. No tidings of it being obtainable, however, we had to depart without it.

We had seen from the upper walls of the castle a place of public entertainment upon a plateau at the distance of but a few paces, so thither we went, with tolerably sharp appetites. We applied for cold beef and bread, &c. Excellent beef and bread were brought, with a bottle of sweet and spiced wine, which we had ordered. We were enjoying our repast satisfactorily enough, when a man came up and inquired in German, whether we were the party that had lost the cloak. My son gave him to understand that we were. He intimated that it was found, and asked whether he should fetch it. We signified our wish that he should do so. Away he went, and in the course of a few minutes he presented himself agair before us with the cloak. We gladly gave him a franc, with which he seemed well pleased ; and so were we.

I inquired the relative proportions of the Protestant and the Catholic population of the city; and was informed that there are three Protestants to one of the other communion. Our repast, which was highly enjoyable, including the wine, or maitrank, cost us only a shilling each, the liquor being twenty-pence of the three shillings. Descending along the shaded path and road by which we had climbed up to the castle, we took our seats in one of the carriages at the foot of the hill, and by that help we reached the station just in time for our departure, by the train we had fixed upon, for Freyburg, where we obtained shelter for the night in a building belonging to the comfortable Hotel d'Allemagne, or the German Hotel, kept by a higbly intelligent, affable, and communicative landlord. The hotel itself was full before we arrived; but our apartments were very comfortable, and we had to walk only a few yards of distance to reach them.

Saturday, July 4th. We had to rise carly, in order to start by an early train; having a long journey before us. It was market-day ; and we found the shops open before six o'clock, and the market well stocked at that early hour. At six we entered the cathedral and found a large con

cess of combustion. Most of the male sex, nearly all, in Germany, indulge in smoking ; and those who don't like tobacco must look out, and shun its fumes if they can, or bear the annoyance as they may be able, if they have not the chance to avoid it. There are carriages provided exclusively for ladies, who may make them their refuge, if willing to be limited to the company of their own sex only; for no gentleman is permitted to intrude himself into those carriages.

Arrived at Heidelberg, we found a large number of carriages in waiting for the accommodation of those who required them, which we did not. Leaving our luggage in charge at the station, we walked along the principal street of the city to the far end, and then mounted the steep hill to the grand old castle, one of the most imposing structures of past ages to be met with in all Europe. It is extensive and grand enough for any potentate ; but its arrangements, of course, do not comport with modern usages and tastes.

It is a strong-hold of tyranny, adapted only for a sovereign tyrant. It contains such a multitude of apartments and passages, that it was, to us, a complete labyrinth, in which we should have been soon lost without a guide. We had to pay the moderate fee of sixpence each for entrance. This included the attendance of a guide-one of the gentler sex, who conducted us all over it. We had a beautiful and extensive prospect from the top of the octagon tower, commanding a full view of the city, the river Neckar, both up and down, and a great length of country in the direction towards Switzerland. Our guide told us the castle was first built by Rudolf, in 1204. The fortification walls are seventeen feet thick. A dungeon was pointed out to us as we passed it on our left, having grooves on each side the entrance, and a slot in the wall above, so as to secure the prisoner or prisoners, by letting down a strong door, as a mouse on taking the bait is secured in a trap by the descent of the door. What a dreadful place of confinement ! And what a devil has man been to man !

A large and beautiful part of the castle, comprising a suit of apartments altogether different from the original fabric, was built in 1612 for the Princess Elizabeth, of England, daughter of our James I., by whom she was given in marriage, early in the following year, to Frederick, the Elector Palatine, whose residence was here. This part of the castle bears the distinctive name of the English part. Gigantic ivy of 200 years' growth now clothes and grasps the walls of one side of the fabric, whilst trees rise from the court below to a great height: one of them, a cherry tree, is seventy feet high, its fruit affording a season-banquet to birds. There are two chapels in the castle: one very old, and long disused ; the other not now used, but still retaining its pulpit, pictures, and other ornaments. The old one,

after its disuse as a place of worship, came into use as a place for making wine. At a short distance from it, and at a lower elevation, is the wine cellar, containing a tun that held sixty thousand bottles of wine. Another, still a little lower in level, held nearly 300,000 bottles! It is

a

the largest wine-tun in the world. It has been more than once filled ; but

; many years have passed since it was used. Over it is a dancing stage, upon which fools cut capers in former times. Drink and dancing seem natural associates. How sad it is that men will abuse what was designed for moderate enjoyment, and not for riotous excess.

When first we entered the castle, we left such articles of clothing and protection as were cumbrous at the door of our guide's residence, near the window at which we had paid our entrance fee. We were invited to put them upon a settle there, and assured that they would be safe ; so there we laid them. On our return to the spot, my daughter's travelling-cloak was missing. It was not of much value, but was very useful on her journeys. No one knew what had become of it. We dare not be positive that we had left it there with our other things; but my daughter believed we had, as did her brother, who had previously carried it up the hill for her. No tidings of it being obtainable, however, we had to depart without it.

We had seen from the upper walls of the castle a place of public entertainment upon a plateau at the distance of but a few paces, so thither we went, with tolerably sharp appetites. We applied for cold beef and bread, &c. Excellent beef and bread were brought, with a bottle of sweet and spiced wine, which we had ordered. We were enjoying our repast satisfactorily enough, when a man came up and inquired in German, whether we were the party that had lost the cloak. My son gave him to understand that we were. He intimated that it was found, and asked whether he should fetch it. We signified our wish that he should do so. Away he went, and in the course of a few minutes he presented himself again before us with the cloak. We gladly gave him a franc, with which he seemed well pleased ; and so were we.

I inquired the relative proportions of the Protestant and the Catholic population of the city; and was informed that there are three Protestants to one of the other communion. Our repast, which was highly enjoyable, including the wine, or maitrank, cost us only a shilling each, the liquor being twenty-pence of the three shillings. Descending along the shaded path and road by which we had climbed up to the castle, we took our seats in one of the carriages at the foot of the hill, and by that help we reached the station just in time for our departure, by the train we had fixed upon, for Freyburg, where we obtained shelter for the night in a building belonging to the comfortable Hotel d'Allemagne, or the German Hotel, kept by a highly intelligent, affable, and communicative landlord. The hotel itself was full before we arrived; but our apartments were very comfortable, and we had to walk only a few yards of distance to reach them.

Saturday, July 4th. We had to rise early, in order to start by an early train; having a long journey before us. It was market-day ; and we

; found the shops open before six o'clock, and the market well stocked at that early hour. At six we entered the cathedral and found a large con

a

gregation assembled, with priests officiating at several altars, at least not fewer than three. The shops and market were all alive to business. In the market were some roots and vegetables that were new to us. The women

were without bonnets, having their heads clothed with coloured cotton-handkerchiefs, like the women in the mills and the country places of the manufacturing districts of Lancashire. There was plenty of grain for sale, comprising wheat, oats, and maize. All looked plump and large. Pigeons were picking up whatever they could find among the market people, and flying about the cathedral, and in and out of its western porch, appearing perfectly tame and fearless.

In journeying to Basle, we had a fine view of the mountain scenery on both hands, especially that of the Black Forest range to our left, the atmosphere being clearer than when I travelled the same line of rails the year before. On reaching Basle, we took an open conveyance from the German railway station, through the city, up to the Swiss station. This afforded us an opportunity of seeing the river, the hotels, and the streets and buildings, without fatigue. We were charged half a crown ; which I thought excessive for three persons. The fare for the persons was three francs ; but the driver demanded payment extra for our luggage, although we had only small and light articles. After

pause of little more than half an hour, during which my son and daughter looked about the upper and newer part of Basle, we started for Oulton and Berne, whence we journeyed to Lausanne, in order to be there for the Sabbath. We passed through a succession of scenery of no ordinary beauty, and through a number of tunnels, one of them 2,697 yards long, near to Lanfelfingen, a place whose name made me almost fancy myself in Wales, as the country also might naturally enough do.

On the journey from Berne, I sat beside a lady in a black silk dress, and velvet collar ornamented with a rosette worked in very small transparent glass beads, that looked like brilliant silver. I observed another lady who wore a checked silk apron attached to a corset that rose to a semicircular finish, overspanning the front of the breast. The dress had

sleeves of the same silk, finished at the elbows with a border of velvet, connecting the corset with a velvet collar. A star in bright white metal was close to each shoulder, and a chain of the same metal suspended

The silk sleeves were quilted with a narrow ribbon to match the pattern of the apron, &c., the prevailing colour being fawn brown. A white habit shirt, very neat and pretty, clothed the bosom. On each shoulder were three black velvet stars, arranged triangularly, about three inches or so apart from each other, with the apex of the triangle downwards, towards the elbow. The attire, as

The attire, as a whole, was picturesque and compact ; more complete than graceful; yet not inelegant; but still in accordance with proportion and harmony more than with Grecian elegance and simplicity.

Approaching Friborg, we passed over a deep defile of romantic con

short

open

a

from each star.

« PreviousContinue »