Page images
PDF
EPUB

the smallest springs the mightiest regular and prompt attendance; as rivers flow, to promote the fruitfulness that he will otherwise be behind the or to bear the commerce of the globe.' other boys, or will lose part of a conFrom the grain of mustard seed, the nected lesson, or will displease the kingdom of heaven is represented as superintendent. In all cases, aim at gradually rising and expanding, till securing your pupil's conscience, by it becomes a great tree, beneath the setting forth, in a few words, that as shade of which all nations of the earth it is his duty to be punctual, you need repose. And so in the history of in- hardly say that you expect him, that dividuals, from the day of small God expects him, that the superinthings, not unfrequently has arisen a tendent, teachers, and all the good career, the brilliancy of which has children in the school expect him to surprised and dazzled the world. It be punctual; tell him that it is your is, for the most part, denied to men wish he should always be in time; who move in a public and extended and in proportion as your scholar is circle, to witness those early displays young, you must impress also his of genius, and that gradual develop- imagination, which may be done ment of talent, which afterwards be- easily, and in the simplest ways. For come so eminent for their splendour instance, in the school to which the and usefulness, and upon which the writer belongs, the superintendent (a eye of a philosopher would love to first-rate one) has given orders to keep dwell. This is usually the privilege the doors closed while the early of a few obscure individuals, who are prayer

is offered. In consequence of determined on “mental improvement.” this salutary regulation, by which Adam Clarke and John Hunt were neither a late teacher nor his scholar men of this class. And the result is

can irreverently march into the school well-known. The new-fledged bird during the devotions of those who first tries its pinions in its own nest, come in time, it usually happens that, or its own sequestered bower, and

upon the opening of the door, when then soars above its native glen, at- the “Amen” is said, a stream of “late tracting the attention and the admira- ones" pours in. The writer has found tion of man by the success it has it beneficial to take hold affectionately achieved, and the boldness of its flight of a new scholar, and turn him round or by the sweetness of its note. And towards the door as this tide sweeps so we often find a peculiar interest by, and ask him whether those are all connected with the early efforts of a ** late boys.” The reply is, “ Yes; mind bent on improvement, and the and pointing with his finger at them first stage of an exalted and illustrious

whilst speaking, it has then been said career, which is effected by a deter- to the new-comer, in a solemn tone, mination that thus it shall be.

“Never let me be grieved by seeing (To be concluded in our next.)

you come in with those boys.' Any little incident of this kind would seize

hold of the imagination, and in conSunday School Column.

sequence, impress indelibly the me

mory of a young man in a strange PERSONAL PUNCTUALITY.-TO school-room; he would never forget TEACHERS.

the pointing of the finger, the wish, PROVIDENCE has given us three modes, nor yet the looks of shame of one or by some one of which, if not by all, two of the good boys who were accievery child may be powerfully wrought dentally late. So much for the first upon. Impress his sense, his con- impressions. science, his imagination. For instance, Always expect every scholar in in the matter of punctual attendance ; your class to be in time. Thus, should if the delinquent be an elder boy, one arrive late, express surprise, and then, in a kind manner, after stating be surprised. He has no business that the rules of the school require whatever to come late. If it is just that it should open at nine and at two after the time, it is all the more inexo'clock-give him one or two simple cusable : for there cannot be any arguments or reasons in favour of a sufficient excuse for coming punctually

man.

self to the care of God. He rode told you what is not true; but it was slowly along, attired in his black robe. unintentionally fear and anxiety Thus he pursued his way through confused me; therefore, pardon me. the gloomy woods of Poland, which With these words, he held forth the scarcely a sunbeam could pierce; but gold; but, to his surprise, not one of there was a light in his soul, for God's the robbers would take it. A strange Holy Spirit irradiated it.

feeling was at work in their hearts. One evening, as he thus journeyed They could not laugh at the pious along, holding communion with God,

Thou shalt not steal," said a on reaching an opening in the thick voice within them. All were deeply forest, a trampling noise was heard, moved. Then, as if seized by a sudand he was instantly surrounded by den impulse, one went and brought figures, some on horseback and some him back his purse, another restored on foot. Knives and swords glittered the book of prayer, while still another in the moonlight, and the pious man led his horse towards him, and helped saw that he was at the mercy of a him to remount it. They then band of robbers. He alighted from unitedly entreated his blessing; and, his horse, and offered his property to solemnly giving it, the good man conthe gang. He gave them a purse tinued his way, lifting up his heart in filled with silver coins, unclasped the gratitude to God, who brought him in gold chain from his neck, took the safety to the end of his journey.gold lace from his cap, drew a ring Abd. from the British Workman. from his finger, and took from his pocket his book of prayer, which was clasped with silver. Not till he had

FAITH INCREASED BY OBEDIENCE. yielded all he possessed, and seen his It is not impossible for a man who horse led away, did Mr. Kant inter- sees difficulties in Scripture which cede for his life.

tend to interfere with his faith, yet “Have you given us all?” cried practically to believe in and submit the robber chief, threateningly. himself to Christ. He can believe “Have you no more money ? '

and obey the Gospel to the extent of In his alarm, the trembling doctor his present light and convictions. answered that he had given them Nor is this only possible; it is such a every coin in his possession; and, on man's unquestionable duty. He has receiving this assurance, he was no right to remain at a distance from allowed to proceed on his journey. the Saviour, as far as the Saviour is

He hastened onward, rejoicing at known to him, or to disobey the his escape, when suddenly his hand truth, as far as he knows it, merely felt something hard in the hem of his because he does not know the whole. robe. It was his gold, which, having His duty is to act up to his present been stitched within the lining of his light at once; waiting for more light, dress, had thus escaped discovery. but waiting not from without, but The good man, in his alarm, had for- from within the church. But still gotten this secret store. His heart, further, it is not only possible, and therefore, again beat with joy, for the also obligatory,-a bounden duty-to money would bear him home to his obey the Gospel even in the midst friends and kindred, and he saw rest of darkness, but this is the surest and shelter in prospect, instead of a means of reaching the light. Let long and painful wandering, with the those who find in Scripture things necessity of begging his way. But hard to be understood," persevere nothis conscience was a tender one, and withstanding in living up to the light he stopped to listen to its voice. It which they have received, and giving cried, in disturbing tones, “ Tell not practical effect to the convictions a lie! Tell not a lie!” These words which they have attained to, dim and burned in his heart. Joy, kindred, imperfect though these convictions and home were forgotten. Mr. Kant and that light may be; and in so did not stop to reason. He retraced doing they will not only fulfil what is his steps, and entering into the midst their undoubted though difficult duty of the robbers, said, meekly, “I have in such circumstances, but they will

66

take the most effectual means for an after a few months, her ardour abated; eventual deliverance from their present she became less warmly attached to trial. The daily work and daily ex- the social means of grace; her place perience of the Christian life, will was often vacant in the class-room, ere long of themselves sweep away and she was numbered with that class many a difficulty which defies the of which there are many in our learning and ingenuity of the schools; churches, lukewarm professors. The

progress of Christian experience She was my friend, and I could not will not only diminish the number of bear that she should become lost to our difficulties, but will increase our the church, when there was so much tolerance for those that remain; and need that every one should stand in the spirit of the blind man restored firmly at his post. I asked her, one to sight, who said in reply to the day, what had happened, that her scribes and Pharisees, Whether harp was no longer tuned to the songs Christ be a sinner or no, know not;

of Zion. Said she, I can hardly one thing I know, that whereas I was tell what is the matter. I know I blind, now I see,”—we, looking back am not as I once was, but the change on what we ourselves have tasted and has been so gradual that I have seen of the goodness of the Lord, will hardly realised it. Sometimes of late be enabled, if not to explain, at least I have almost doubted whether relito disregard, whatever seems to pre- gion is all I have supposed it to be; sent difficulties in the way of our

whether it is really the one thing perfect faith in Christ, saying that needful.' I am young, inexperienced, we are “not ashamed of the Gospel of and, of course, look up to those who Christ," for we have ourselves found have been long in the way, and feel it, in our own cases, to be “the power quite safe to follow in their footsteps. of God unto salvation." And what But when I meet them day after day, more would we have ?-The Increase and never hear them talk of those of Faith. Blackwood & Sons. Pp. things that they profess to consider of 152-4.

the highest importance, I am led to

think that either they are not sincere, CHRISTIAN CONVERSATION.

or else there is no need of making I OFTEN wonder why it is that Chris

much ado about religion.” tians do not converse more with each other and with the unconverted about

PRESENCE OF GOD. religion. It would seem that some THE habitual conviction of the prevery worthy church members consider sence of God is the only remedy in the things of this life of more impor- temptations; it supports, it consoles, tance than those that pertain to a

it calms us.

We must not be surfuture state of being, if we may judge prised that we are tempted. We are from their conversation. They attend placed here to be proved by tempthe weekly class and prayer meetings, tations. Everything is temptation to always taking an active part, and Crosses irritate our pride, and seeming to be all alive to the cause, prosperity flatters it: our life is a and then go away feeling that they continual warfare, but Jesus Christ have discharged their whole duty; combats with us. We must let tempand the subject of religion is not tations, like a tempest, beat upon our again mentioned by them until the hearts, and still move on; next weekly meeting. Now, is this traveller surprised on the way by a right?

It seems to me entirely storm, who wraps his cloak about him wrong.

and goes on his journey in spite of the I believe that if Christians were opposing elements. In a certain more in earnest, more ready to con- sense, there is little to do in doing verse on religious subjects, there the will of God. Still, it is true that might be an immense amount of good it is a great work, because it must be done in the world. I once knew a without any reserve.

This spirit lady who started well in religion, and enters the secret foldings of our hearts, gave promise of becoming a bright and even the most upright affections, and shining light in the church. But and the most necessary attachments

us.

like a

man.

self to the care of God. He rode told you what is not true; but it was slowly along, attired in his black robe. unintentionally ; fear and anxiety Thus he pursued his way through confused me; therefore, pardon me. the gloomy woods of Poland, which With these words, he held forth the scarcely a sunbeam could pierce; but gold; but, to his surprise, not one of there was a light in his soul, for God's the robbers would take it. A strange Holy Spirit irradiated it.

feeling was at work in their hearts. One evening, as he thus journeyed They could not laugh at the pious along, holding communion with God,

Thou shalt not steal,said a on reaching an opening in the thick voice within them. All were deeply forest, a trampling noise was heard, moved. Then, as if seized by a sudand he was instantly surrounded by den impulse, one went and brought figures, some on horseback and some him back his purse, another restored on foot. Knives and swords glittered the book of prayer, while still another in the moonlight, and the pious man led his horse towards him, and helped saw that he was at the mercy of a him to remount it. They then band of robbers. He alighted from unitedly entreated his blessing; and, his horse, and offered his property to solemnly giving it, the good man conthe gang

He gave them a purse tinued his way, lifting up his heart in filled with silver coins, unclasped the gratitude to God, who brought him in gold chain from his neck, took the safety to the end of his journey.gold lace from his cap, drew a ring Abd. from the British Workman. from his finger, and took from his pocket his book of prayer, which was clasped with silver. Not till he had

FAITH INCREASED BY OBEDIENCE. yielded all he possessed, and seen his It is not impossible for a man who horse led away, did Mr. Kant inter- sees difficulties in Scripture which cede for his life.

tend to interfere with his faith, yet “ Have you given us all?” cried practically to believe in and submit the robber chief, threateningly. himself to Christ. He can believe “Have you no more money?"

and obey the Gospel to the extent of In his alarm, the trembling doctor his present light and convictions. answered that he had given them Nor is this only possible; it is such a every coin in his possession; and, on man's unquestionable duty. He has receiving this assurance, he was no right to remain at a distance from allowed to proceed on his journey. the Saviour, as far as the Saviour is

He hastened onward, rejoicing at known to him, or to disobey the his escape, when suddenly his hand truth, as far as he knows it, merely felt something hard in the hem of his because he does not know the whole. robe. It was his gold, which, having His duty is to act up to his present been stitched within the lining of his light at once; waiting for more light, dress, had thus escaped discovery. but waiting not from without, but The good man, in his alarm, had for- from within the church. But still gotten this secret store. His heart, further, it is not only possible, and therefore, again beat with joy, for the also obligatory,-a bounden duty-to money would bear him home to his obey the Gospel even in the midst friends and kindred, and he saw rest of darkness, but this is the surest and shelter in prospect, instead of a means of reaching the light. Let long and painful wandering, with the those who find in Scripture " things necessity of begging his way. But hard to be understood,” persevere nothis conscience was a tender one, and withstanding in living up to the light he stopped to listen to its voice. It which they have received, and giving cried, in disturbing tones, “ Tell not practical effect to the convictions a lie! Tell not a lie!” These words which they have attained to, dim and burned in his heart. Joy, kindred, imperfect though these convictions and home were forgotten. Mr. Kant and that light may be; and in so did not stop to reason. He retraced doing they will not only fulfil what is his steps, and entering into the midst their undoubted though difficult duty of the robbers, said, meekly, “I have in such circumstances, but they will SHILLOOK COUNTRY AND we lay it to heart! We see our friends VILLAGES, CENTRAL AFRICA. and neighbours die among us! but VERILY it is a pleasant voyage (as

how seldom does it occur to our cending the Nile); disgusting naked

thoughts that our knell shall perhaps savages, everlasting marshes teeming give the next fruitless warning to the with mosquitoes, and the entire

world! country devoid of anything of either

CHEERFUL PEOPLE. common interest or beauty. Course west the whole day; saw giraffes and

God bless the cheerful person !-man, one ostrich on the east bank. On the woman, or child, old or young, illitewest bank there is a regular line of rate or educated, handsome or homely, villages throughout the day's voyage Over and above every other social within half a mile of each other, the

trait stands cheerfulness. What the country very thickly populated. The sun is to nature—what God is to the huts are of mud, thatched, having a

stricken heart which knows how to very small entrance; they resemble lean upon Him, are cheerful persons button mushrooms. The Shillooks in the house and by the wayside. are wealthy, immense herds of cattle They go unobtrusively, unconsciously, swarm throughout their country. The

about their silent mission, brightening natives navigate the river in two up society around them with the hapkinds of canoes-one of which is a piness beaming from their faces. We curious combination of raft and canoe, love to 'sit near them; we love the formed of the ambatch wood, which glance of their eye, the tone of their is so light, that the whole affair is voice. Little children find them out, portable. The ambatch (Anemone O! so quickly, amid the densest crowd, mirabilis), is seldom larger than a and, passing by the knotted brow and man's waist, and as it tapers naturally compressed lip, glide near, and, layto a point, the canoe rafts are quickly ing a confiding little hand on their formed by lathing the branches pa

knee, lift their clear young eyes to rallel to each other, and tying the

those loving faces. narrow ends together.— Baker's Explorations, vol. i. p. 45.

PEOPLE WE DO NOT LIKE.

THERE are people whom we do not LIFE.

like, though we may have known LIFE is beautifully compared to a them long, and have no fault to find fountain fed by a thousand streams, with them, except that their appearthat perish if one be dried. It is a ance is so much against them. That silver cord twisted with a thousand is not all, if we could find it out. strings, that part asunder if one be There is, generally, a reason for this broken. Frail and thoughtless mor- prejudice, for nature is true to itself. tals are surrounded by innumerable They may be very good sort of people, dangers, which make it much more too, in their way, but still something strange that they escape so long, than is the matter. There is a coldness, a that they almost all perish suddenly selfishness, a levity, an insincerity, at last. We are encompassed with which we cannot fix upon any paraccidents every day to crush the ticular phrase or action, but we see it mouldering tenements we inhabit. in their whole persons and deportThe seeds of disease are planted in ments. One reason that we do not our constitution by nature. The earth see it in any other way may be, that and atmosphere whence we draw the they are all the time trying to conceal breath of life are impregnated with this defect by every means in their death; the food that nourishes it con- power. tains the elements of decay; the soul that animates it, by vivifying first,

MRS. FRY'S ADVICE TO HER SONS. tends to wear it out by its own action. Be not double-minded in any degree, Death lurks in ambush along the path. but faithfully maintain, not only the Notwithstanding this is the truth so upright principle on religious grounds, palpably confirmed by the daily ex- but also the brightest honour, acamples before our eyes, how little do cording even to the maxims of the

« PreviousContinue »