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take the most effectual means for an after a few months, her ardour abated; eventual deliverance from their present she became less warmly attached to trial. The daily work and daily ex- the social means of grace; her place perience of the Christian life, will was often vacant in the class-room, ere long of themselves sweep away

and she was numbered with that class many a difficulty which defies the of which there are many in our learning and ingenuity of the schools; churches, lukewarm professors. The progress of Christian experience She was my friend, and I could not will not only diminish the number of bear that she should become lost to our difficulties, but will increase our the church, when there was so much tolerance for those that remain; and need that every one should stand in the spirit of the blind man restored firmly at his post. I asked her, one to sight, who said in reply to the day, what had happened, that her scribes and Pharisees, Whether harp was no longer tuned to the songs Christ be a sinner or no, I know not; of Zion. Said she, “I can hardly one thing I know, that whereas I was tell what is the matter. I know I blind, now I see,”—we, looking back am not as I once was, but the change on what we ourselves have tasted and has been so gradual that I have seen of the goodness of the Lord, will hardly realised it. Sometimes of late be enabled, if not to explain, at least I have almost doubted whether relito disregard, whatever seems to pre- gion is all I have supposed it to be; sent difficulties in the way of our

whether it is really the one thing perfect faith in Christ, saying that needful.' I am young, inexperienced, we are “not ashamed of the Gospel of and, of course, look up to those who Christ,” for we have ourselves found have been long in the way, and feel it, in our own cases, to be “the power quite safe to follow in their footsteps. of God unto salvation.” And what But when I meet them day after day, more would we have ?-The Increase and never hear them talk of those of Faith. Blackwood & Sons. Pp. things that they profess to consider of 152—4.

the highest importance, I am led to

think that either they are not sincere, CHRISTIAN CONVERSATION.

or else there is no need of making

much ado about religion.” I OFTEN wonder why it is that Christians do not converse more with each other and with the unconverted about

PRESENCE OF GOD. religion. It would seem that some THE habitual conviction of the prevery worthy church members consider sence of God is the only remedy in the things of this life of more impor- temptations; it supports, it consoles, tance than those that pertain to a

it calms us.

We must not be surfuture state of being, if we may judge prised that we are tempted. We are from their conversation. Th attend placed here to be proved by tempthe weekly class and prayer meetings, tations. Everything is temptation to always taking an active part, and Crosses irritate our pride, and seeming to be all alive to the cause, prosperity flatters it: our life is a and then go away feeling that they · continual warfare, but Jesus Christ have discharged their whole duty; combats with us. We must let tempand the subject of religion is not tations, like a tempest, beat upon our again mentioned by them until the hearts, and still move on ; next weekly meeting. Now, is this traveller surprised on the way by a right?

It seems to me entirely storm, who wraps his cloak about him wrong

and goes on his journey in spite of the I believe that if Christians were

opposing elements. In a certain more in earnest, more ready to con- sense, there is little to do in doing

on religious subjects, there the will of God. Still, it is true that might be an immense amount of good it is a great work, because it must be done in the world. I once knew a without any reserve.

This spirit lady who started well in religion, and enters the secret foldings of our hearts, gave promise of becoming a bright and even the most upright affections, and shining light in the church. But and the most necessary attachments

us.

like a

verse

the gang.

self to the care of God. He rode told you what is not true; but it was slowly along, attired in his black robe. unintentionally ; fear and anxiety Thus he pursued his way through confused me; therefore, pardon me.' the gloomy woods of Poland, which With these words, he held forth the scarcely a sunbeam could pierce; but gold; but, to his surprise, not one of there was a light in his soul, for God's the robbers would take it. A strange Holy Spirit irradiated it.

feeling was at work their hearts. One evening, as he thus journeyed They could not laugh at the pious along, holding communion with God, man. Thou shalt not steal,said a on reaching an opening in the thick voice within them. All were deeply forest, a trampling noise was heard, moved. Then, as if seized by a sudand he was instantly surrounded by den impulse, one went and brought figures, some on horseback and some him back his purse, another restored on foot. Knives and swords glittered the book of prayer, while still another in the moonlight, and the pious man led his horse towards him, and helped saw that he was at the mercy of a him to remount it. They then band of robbers. He alighted from unitedly entreated his blessing; and, his horse, and offered his property to solemnly giving it, the good man con

He gave them a purse tinued his way, lifting up his heart in filled with silver coins, unclasped the gratitude to God, who brought him in gold chain from his neck, took the safety to the end of his journey.gold lace from his cap, drew a ring Abd. from the British Workman. from his finger, and took from his pocket his book of prayer, which was clasped with silver. Not till he had

FAITH INCREASED BY OBEDIENCE. yielded all he possessed, and seen his It is not impossible for a man who horse led away, did Mr. Kant inter- sees difficulties in Scripture which cede for his life.

tend to interfere with his faith, yet “Have you given us all?” cried practically to believe

in and submit the robber chief, threateningly. himself to Christ. He can believe “Have you no more money ?”

and obey the Gospel to the extent of In his alarm, the trembling doctor his present light and convictions. answered that he had given them Nor is this only possible; it is such a every coin in his possession; and, on man's unquestionable duty. He has receiving this assurance, he was no right to remain at a distance from allowed to proceed on his journey. the Saviour, as far as the Saviour is

He hastened onward, rejoicing at known to him, or to disobey the his escape, when suddenly his hand truth, as far as he knows it, merely felt something hard in the hem of his because he does not know the whole. robe. It was his gold, which, having His duty is to act up to his present been stitched within the lining of his light at once; waiting for more light, dress, had thus escaped discovery. but waiting not from without, but The good man, in his alarm, had for- from within the church. But still gotten this secret store. His heart, further, it is not only possible, and therefore, again beat with joy, for the also obligatory,--a bounden duty-to money would bear him home to his

obey the Gospel even in the midst friends and kindred, and he saw rest of darkness, but this is the surest and shelter in prospect, instead of a means of reaching the light. Let long and painful wandering, with the those who find in Scripture “ things necessity of begging his way. But hard to be understood,” persevere nothis conscience was a tender one, and withstanding in living up to the light he stopped to listen to its voice. It which they have received, and giving cried, in disturbing tones,

6 Tell not

practical effect to the convictions a lie! Tell not a lie!” These words which they have attained to, dim and burned in his heart. Joy, kindred, imperfect though these convictions and home were forgotten. Mr. Kant and that light may be; and in so did not stop to reason.

He retraced doing they will not only fulfil what is his steps, and entering into the midst their undoubted though difficult duty of the robbers, said, meekly, “I have in such circumstances, but they will

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take the most effectual means for an after a few months, her ardour abated; eventual deliverance from their present she became less warmly attached to trial. The daily work and daily ex

the social means of grace; her place perience of the Christian life, will was often vacant in the class-room, ere long of themselves sweep away

and she was numbered with that class many a difficulty which defies the of which there are many in our learning and ingenuity of the schools; churches, lukewarm professors. The progress of Christian experience She was my friend, and I could not will not only diminish the number of bear that she should become lost to our difficulties, but will increase our the church, when there was so much tolerance for those that remain; and need that everyone should stand in the spirit of the blind man restored firmly at his post. I asked her, one to sight, who said in reply to the day, what had happened, that her scribes and Pharisees, Whether harp was no longer tuned to the songs Christ be a sinner or no, I know not;

of Zion. Said she,

I can hardly one thing I know, that whereas I was tell what is the matter. I know I blind, now I see,"-we, looking back am not as I once was, but the change on what we ourselves have tasted and has been so gradual that I have seen of the goodness of the Lord, will hardly realised it. Sometimes of late be enabled, if not to explain, at least

I have almost doubted whether relito disregard, whatever seems to pre- gion is all I have supposed it to be; sent difficulties in the way of our

whether it is really the one thing perfect faith in Christ, saying that needful.' I am young, inexperienced, we are “not ashamed of the Gospel of and, of course, look up to those who Christ,” for we have ourselves found have been long in the way, and feel it, in our own cases, to be “ the power quite safe to follow in their footsteps. of God unto salvation.” And what But when I meet them day after day, more would we have ?—The Increase and never hear them talk of those of Faith. Blackwood & Sons. Pp. things that they profess to consider of 152-4.

the highest importance, I am led to

think that either they are not sincere, CHRISTIAN CONVERSATION.

or else there is no need of making I

much ado about religion.” OFTEN wonder why it is that Christians do not converse more with each other and with the unconverted about

PRESENCE OF GOD. religion. It would seem that some THE habitual conviction of the prevery worthy church members consider sence of God is the only remedy in the things of this life of more impor- temptations; it supports, it consoles, tance than those that pertain to a

it calms us. We must not be surfuture state of being, if we may judge prised that we are tempted. We are from their conversation. They attend placed here to be proved by tempthe weekly class and prayer meetings, tations. Everything is temptation to always taking an active part, and Crosses irritate our pride, and seeming to be all alive to the cause, prosperity flatters it: our life is a and then go away feeling that they continual warfare, but Jesus Christ have discharged their whole duty;

combats with us. We must let tempand the subject of religion is not tations, like a tempest, beat upon our again mentioned by them until the hearts, and still move on; next weekly meeting. Now, is this traveller surprised on the way by a right? It seems to me entirely storm, who wraps his cloak about him

and goes on his journey in spite of the I believe that if Christians were

opposing elements. In a certain more in earnest, more ready to con- sense, there is little to do in doing verse on religious subjects, there the will of God. Still, it is true that might be an immense amount of good it is a great work, because it must be done in the world. I once knew a without any reserve.

This spirit lady who started well in religion, and enters the secret foldings of our hearts, gave promise of becoming a bright and even the most upright affections, and shining light in the church. But and the most necessary attachments

us.

like a

wrong.

must be regulated by His will ; but we thought that the unseen land on it is not the multitude of hard duties, the opposite side was closing in, and it is not constraint and contentions that we were near the end of the lake. that advance us in our Christian But next morning we sailed through course. On the contrary, it is the one of the clouds on our own side, yielding of our wills, without res- and discovered that it was neither triction and without choice, to tread smoke nor haze, but countless millions cheerfully every day in the path in of minute midges called “kungo.” (a which Providence leads us, to seek cloud or fog). They filled the air to nothing, to be discouraged by nothing, an immense height, and swarmed to see our duty in the present moment, upon the water, too light to sink in it. to trust all else without reserve to Eyes and mouth had to be kept closed the will and power of God. Let us while passing through the living cloud: pray to our Heavenly Father that our they struck upon the face like fine wills

may be swallowed up in His.- drifting snow. Thousands lay in the Fenelon.

boat when she emerged from the cloud

of midges. The people gather these THE GROUPING OF THE APOSTLES minute insects by night, and boil them BY CHRIST.

into thick cakes, to be used as arelish It will be noticed that the list of the -millions of midges in a cake. A twelve apostles consists of pairs. The

kungo cake, an inch thick and as names are recorded in couplets. And

large as the blue bonnet of a Scotch Mark says expressly that our Saviour ploughman, was offered to us; it was “ called unto him the twelve, and

very dark in colour, and tasted not began to send them forth by two and

unlike caviare, or salted locusts.two” (vi. 7). It is also noticeable The Livingstones'. Narrative of an that there are pairs of pairs, the twelve

Expedition to the Zambesi, &c., p. being divided into three of these pairs

373. of pairs, or quaternions. The first quaternion consists of Peter and An- SINGULAR FACT IN ORNITHOLOGY. drew, James and John. The second One of the comb or knob-nosed geese, consists of Philip and Bartholomew, on being strangled in order to have its Thomas and Matthew. The third skin preserved without injury, conconsists of James, the son of Alphæus, tinued to breathe audibly by the broken and Lebbæus, Simon the Canaanite humerus,or wing-bone,and other means and Judas Iscariot. These were real had to be adopted to put it out of pain. and discriminated groups; for, while This was as if a man on the gallows variations in pairing are found in dif- were to continue to breathe by a broken ferent lists, yet in them all (Matt. x. arm-bone, and afforded us an illustra2-4 ; Mark iii. 16-19; Luke vi. 14-16 ; tion of the fact that, in birds, the vital Acts i. 13) the quaternions comprise air penetrates every part of the inteexactly the same group of individuals. rior of their bodies. The breath passes In all the lists, besides, Peter is the through and round about the lungs leader of the first quaternion, Philip -bathes thé surfaces of the viscera, the leader of the second, and James and enters the cavities of the bones; the son of Alphæus the leader of the it even penetrates into some spaces third.-Dr. Morison's Commentary of between the muscles of the neck-and the New Testament, p. 166.

thus not only is the most perfect

oxygenation of the blood secured, but, CLOUDS OF INSECTS IN EASTERN the temperature of the blood being AFRICA.

very high, the air in every part is DURING a portion of the year, the rarefied, and the great lightness and northern dwellers on the lake (Ny- vigour provided for, that the habits assa) have a harvest which furnishes of birds require. Several birds were a singular sort of food. As we ap- found by Dr. Kirk, to have marrow proached our limit in that direction, in the tibiæ, though these bones are clouds, as of smoke rising from miles generally described as hollow. The of burning grass, were observed bend- Livingstones' Narrative of an Expeing in a south-easterly direction, and dition to the Zambesi, &c., p. 454.

m

we lay it to heart! We see our friends and neighbours die among us! but how seldom does it occur to our thoughts that our knell shall perhaps give the next fruitless warning to the world !

SHILLOOK COUNTRY AND VILLAGES, CENTRAL AFRICA. Verily it is a pleasant voyage (ascending the Vile); disgusting naked savages, everlasting marshes teeming with mosquitoes, and the entire country devoid of anything of either common interest or beauty. Course west the whole day; saw giraffes and one ostrich on the east bank. On the west bank there is a regular line of villages throughout the day's voyage within half a mile of each other; the country very thickly populated. The huts are of mud, thatched, having a very small entrance; they resemble button mushrooms. The Shillooks are wealthy, immense herds of cattle swarm throughout their country. The natives navigate the river in two kinds of canoes--one of which is a curious combination of raft and canoe, formed of the ambatch wood, which is so light, that the whole affair is portable. The ambatch (Anemone mirabilis), is seldom larger than a man's waist, and as it tapers naturally to a point, the canoe rafts are quickly formed by lathing the branches parallel to each other, and tying the narrow ends together.- Baker's Explorations, vol. i. p. 15.

CHEERFUL PEOPLE. God bless the cheerful person !-man, woman, or child, old or young, illiterate or educated, handsome or homely. Over and above every other social trait stands cheerfulness. What the sun is to nature—what God is to the stricken heart which knows how to lean upon Him, are cheerful persons in the house and by the wayside. They go unobtrusively, unconsciously, about their silent mission, brightening up society around them with the happiness beaming from their faces. We love to sit near them; we love the glance of their eye, the tone of their voice. Little children find them out, O! so quickly, amid the densest crowd, and, passing by the knotted brow and compressed lip, glide near, and, laying a confiding little hand on their knee, lift their clear young eyes to those loving faces.

LIFE. LIFE is beautifully compared to a fountain fed by a thousand streams, that perish if one be dried. It is a silver cord twisted with a thousand strings, that part asunder if one be broken. Frail and thoughtless mortals are surrounded by innumerable dangers, which make it much more strange that they escape so long, than that they almost all perish suddenly at last. We are encompassed with accidents every day to crush the mouldering tenements we inhabit. The seeds of disease are planted in our constitution by nature. The earth and atmosphere whence we draw the breath of life are impregnated with death; the food that nourishes it contains the elements of decay ; the soul that animates it, by vivifying first, tends to wear it out by its own action. Death lurks in ambush along the path. Notwithstanding this is the truth so palpably confirmed by the daily examples before our eyes, how little do

PEOPLE WE DO NOT LIKE. THERE are people whom we do not like, though we may have known them long, and have no fault to find with them, except that their appearance is so much against them: That is not all, if we could find it out. There is, generally, a reason for this prejudice, for nature is true to itself. They may be very good sort of people, too, in their way, but still something is the matter. There is a coldness, a selfishness, a levity, an insincerity, which we cannot fix upon any particular phrase or action, but we see it in their whole persons and deportments. One reason that we do not see it in any other way may be, that they are all the time trying to conceal this defect by every means in their power.

MRS. FRY'S ADVICE TO HER SONS. BE not double-minded in any degree, but faithfully maintain, not only the upright principle on religious grounds, but also the brightest honour, according even to the maxims of the

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