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must be regulated by His will; but we thought that the unseen land on it is not the multitude of hard duties, the opposite side was closing in, and it is not constraint and contentions that we were near the end of the lake. that advance us in our Christian But next morning we sailed through course. On the contrary, it is the one of the clouds on our own side, yielding of our wills, without res- and discovered that it was neither triction and without choice, to tread smoke nor haze, but countless millions cheerfully every day in the path in of minute midges called “kungo.” (a which Providence leads us, to seek cloud or fog). They filled the air to nothing, to be discouraged by nothing, an immense height, and swarmed to see our duty in the present moment, upon the water, too light to sink in it. to trust all else without reserve to Eyes and mouth had to be kept closed the will and power of God. Let us while passing through the living cloud: pray to our Heavenly Father that our they struck upon the face like fine wills may be swallowed up in His. drifting snow. Thousands lay in the Fenelon.

boat when she emerged from the cloud

of midges. The people gather these THE GROUPING OF THE APOSTLES minute insects by night, and boil them BY CHRIST.

into thick cakes, to be used as arelish It will be noticed that the list of the -millions of midges in a cake. A twelve apostles consists of pairs. The

kungo cake, an inch thick and as names are recorded in couplets. And large as the blue bonnet of a Scotch Mark says expressly that our Saviour ploughman, was offered to us; it was “ called unto him the twelve, and very dark in colour, and tasted not began to send them forth by two and

unlike caviare, or salted locusts.two" (vi. 7). It is also noticeable The Livingstones'. Narrative of an that there are pairs of pairs, the twelve

Expedition to the Zambesi, &c.; p.

373. being divided into three of these pairs of pairs, or quaternions. The first quaternion consists of Peter and An- SINGULAR FACT IN ORNITHOLOGY. drew, James and John. The second One of the comb or knob-nosed geese, consists of Philip and Bartholomew, on being strangled in order to have its Thomas and Matthew. The third skin preserved without injury, conconsists of James, the son of Alphæus, tinued to breathe audibly by the broken and Lebbæus, Simon the Canaanite humerus,or wing.bone,and other means and Judas Iscariot. These were real had to be adopted to put it out of pain. and discriminated groups; for, while This was as if a man on the gallows variations in pairing are found in dif- were to continue to breathe by a broken ferent lists, yet in them all (Matt. x. arm-bone, and afforded us an illustra2-4 ; Mark iii. 16-19; Luke vi. 14-16; tion of the fact that, in birds, the vital Acts i. 13) the quaternions comprise air penetrates every part of the inteexactly the same group of individuals. rior of their bodies. The breath passes In all the lists, besides, Peter is the through and round about the lungs leader of the first quaternion, Philip -bathes thé surfaces of the viscera, the leader of the second, and James and enters the cavities of the bones; the son of Alphæus the leader of the it even penetrates into some spaces third.-Dr. Morison's Commentary of between the muscles of the neck-and the New Testament, p. 166.

thus not only is the most perfect

oxygenation of the blood secured, but, CLOUDS OF INSECTS IN EASTERN the temperature of the blood being AFRICA.

very high, the air in every part is DURING a portion of the year, the rarefied, and the great lightness and northern dwellers on the lake (Ny vigour provided for, that the habits assa) have a harvest which furnishes of birds require. Several birds were a singular sort of food. As we ap- found by Dr. Kirk, to have marrow proached our limit in that direction, in the tibiæ, though these bones are clouds, as of smoke rising from miles generally described as hollow. The of burning grass, were observed bend- Livingstones' Narrative of an Expeing in a south-easterly direction, and dition to the Zambesi, &c., p. 454.

Then, failing to conquer, with passionate cry, The spectacle of the moon passing He quivers his lips, keeps a tear in his eye; Mars and Regulus on the 18th from And so wins the battle, this wise little thing, 9.45 to 10.45 in the evening will be He knows the world over that Baby is King. exceedingly interesting. Regulus

ERATO.

will be occulted for a few minutes

after ten o'clock. Phenomena of the Months. Mercury rises in daylight, and is

an evening star, On the 26th it sets MAY.

two hours and nine minutes after the The increase of temperature during sun—the greatest interval between this month is, on the average of fifty

their times of setting that occurs years, greater than that of any of the during the present year. Mercury spring and summer months. March may be favourably observed on fine and April have each an increase of evenings between the 19th and 31st. five degrees; May, seven degrees;

Venus becomes an evening star June, only four ; July, only a varia

after the 11th, and sets thirty-three tion of two. There is thus a certain

minutes after the sun on the 31st. average increase of heat during the Mars continues to set after midyear, up to the middle of July. In night, and is near to Regulus all the May the average rises from 50 degrees month. on the 1st, to 56 and 57 degrees on the

Jupiter is a morning star, and sets last two days; there being nine days at

in daylight. 51 degrees; seven days at 52 degrees ;

Saturn rises a few minutes after two at 52 ; three at 54; four at 55 ; ten o'clock in the evening of the 1st, four at 56 ; and one at 57 degrees.

and as the sun sets on the 31st. There was less rain in May last year by four-fifths of an inch than the ave

Passing Events. rage of the previous seven years.

Daylight increases during the month The great event of the month, politione hour and twenty-five minutes, cally, and perhaps religiously, has that is, forty-three minutes in the

taken place. This country, by its morning, and forty-two minutes in the representatives, has declared, by evening. The sun rises on the 1st majority of 120, that the Irish Church at thirty-five minutes after four, and shall be disendowed and disestasets at nineteen minutes after seven ; blished. There is the fact. What on the 15th it rises at twelve minutes obstructions the bill may meet with after four, and sets at nineteen minutes in committee remains to be seen. before eight; and on the 31st it rises What may be its fate in the House of at eight minutes before four, and sets Lords cannot be predicted with any at one minute past eight.

certainty. The Christian, however, The moon is new on the 11th at can afford to wait, with the assurance seven minutes after four in the after- that “The Lord reigneth.” noon, and full on the 25th at twenty- Though much less in importance, three minutes after three in the after- yet the Chancellor's budget shows a

On the first Sunday it does breadth of view which we cannot but not rise until after midnight; on the regard with pleasure. Any thing done second Sunday it sets at five in the which may teach the working man to afternoon; on the third Sunday it sets exercise prudent forethought would a little after midnight; on the fourth remove half the misery which now he Sunday it rises at ten minutes after suffers. Heretofore, if a man wished five in the afternoon, and sets at a quar- to insure his furniture and effects ter past three in the morning; and on against the risk of fire, he was met the fifth Sunday it does not rise until with a government duty heavier than midnight.

the expense of the risk. Mr. Lowe The moon is near to Jupiter on the proposes the remission of this duty 10th ; to Venus on the 11th ; to Mer- altogether, and we thank him for it. cury on the 12th; to Uranus on the We hope that our fellow working men 15th ; to Regulus and Mars on the will insure their property without any 18th ; and to Saturn on the 26th. unnecessary delay.

noon.

When we look over our globe, with meeting. We are in a position now its moving mass of human beings, we to state that many chapels have been are reminded of the lines of Crabbe: placed at the disposal of the Commit

tee on June 6th, for sermons for the “Here with an infant joyful sponsors come, Association. If our country brethren Then bear the new-made Christian to his

come up in the fulness of the blessing home.

of the gospel of peace, there will be A few short years, and we behold him stand,

congregations in various parts of Lon

don to welcome and listen to them. To ask a blessing, with his bride in hand. A few still seeming shorter, and we hear

But we know not what a day may His widow weeping at her husband's bier.” bring forth. There are registered on

our pages for January and February Such is life. The great thing is to

the deaths of fourteen of our members fill up life's short day well, so that the or our members' wives. It is possible Master of the vineyard may give that some of us, who are calculating every one of us his penny.

on meeting our friends below, may be We would still keep before the called in the interim to join our friends minds of our brethren the annual above.

Mutual-Jid Association Reporter.

GENERAL COMMITTEE.
THE monthly meeting was held at
Brother D. Plant's, 5, Upper Portland
Place, Wandsworth Road, on Mon-
day, April 12th.

Present : Brothers Plant (chair),
Durley, Wade 1st, Coman, Harding,
Chamberlain, Carter, Creswell, Sims,
Parker, Jameson, and Salisbury.

Prayer was offered by the Honorary Secretary.

The minutes were read and confirmed.

The monthly abstract showed 5 members dead and 1 wife, 63 sick members, and 94 annuitants.

The total receipts through local committees were £1,736 ls. 6d., and the total payments £1,503 5s. 6d.

The Honorary Secretary reported that W. M'Arthur, Esq., M.P., had consented to take the chair at the annual public meeting, King's Cross Chapel, June 7th.

Brothers Durley, Sims, Salisbury, and others reported progress in the arrangements for sermons and accommodation required. After some consideration, all final determinations were left to next meeting, the brethren to assemble at 3 p.m. precisely for that purpose.

The Treasurer reported that he had been informed of a legacy of £100, left by the late John Whalley, Esq., of Stockton-on-Tees.

Letters were read and determined

upon from Rotherham, Coventry, Grantham, and Bristol.

Brother W. L., of C., applied for help. He is 69 years old, has been a preacher for fifty years. Has struggled to earn his bread as a travelling tinker and hawker, but has only managed to earn about 4s. or 5s. a week, on the average. He is now assailed with rheumatism, has lost his wife, has one son living in Manchester, who will find a home for him, but is not able to support him entirely. It was resolved that he have three shillings per week.

There was a conversation on magazine affairs; and the Secretary was instructed to make an estimate of the cost of printing all Association matters in the magazine, and lay the same before the annual meeting.

Several Union matters were settled; and after prayer by Brother Durley, the brethren separated.

The next meeting will be at Brother Creswell's, Prospect House, Mitcham, on Wednesday, 12th May, at three o'clock.

DIED. March 15, 1869. Daniel Sumner, of Walsall, aged 61. Claim £6. He has left a delightful testimony of the life and death of a Christian.

March 24, 1869. Charles Smith, of Derby, aged 51. Claim £6. His end was peace.

Then, failing to conquer, with passionate cry, He quivers his lips, keeps a tear in his eye; And so wins the battle, this wise little thing, He knows the world over that Baby is King.

ERATO.

Phenomena of the Months.

The spectacle of the moon passing Mars and Regulus on the 18th from 9.45 to 10.45 in the evening will be exceedingly interesting. Regulus will be occulted for a few minutes after ten o'clock.

Mercury rises in daylight, and is an evening star, On the 26th it sets two hours and nine minutes after the sun—the greatest interval between their times of setting that occurs during the present year. Mercury may be favourably observed on fine evenings between the 19th and 31st.

Venus becomes an evening star after the 11th, and sets thirty-three minutes after the sun on the 31st.

Mars continues to set after midnight, and is near to Regulus all the month.

Jupiter is a morning star, and sets in daylight.

Saturn rises a few minutes after ten o'clock in the evening of the 1st, and as the sun sets on the 31st.

Passing Ebents.

MAY. The increase of temperature during this month is, on the average of fifty years, greater than that of any of the spring and summer months. March and April have each an increase of five degrees ; May, seven degrees; June, only four ; July, only a variation of two. There is thus a certain average increase of heat during the year, up to the middle of July. In May the average rises from 50 degrees on the 1st, to 56 and 57 degrees on the last two days; there being nine days at 51 degrees; seven days at 52 degrees ; two at 52 ; three at 54; four at 55 ; four at 56 ; and one at 57 degrees. There was less rain in May last year by four-fifths of an inch than the average of the previous seven years.

Daylight increases during the month one hour and twenty-five minutes, that is, forty-three minutes in the morning, and forty-two minutes in the evening. The sun rises on the 1st at thirty-five minutes after four, and sets at nineteen minutes after seven ; on the 15th it rises at twelve minutes after four, and sets at nineteen minutes before eight; and on the 31st it rises at eight minutes before four, and sets at one minute past eight.

The moon is new on the 11th at seven minutes after four in the afternoon, and full on the 25th at twentythree minutes after three in the after

On the first Sunday it does not rise until after midnight; on the second Sunday it sets at five in the afternoon; on the third Sunday it sets a little after midnight; on the fourth Sunday it rises at ten minutes after five in the afternoon, and sets at a quarter past three in the morning; and on the fifth Sunday it does not rise until midnight.

The moon is near to Jupiter on the 10th ; to Venus on the 11th ; to Mercury on the 12th; to Uranus on the 15th; to Regulus and Mars on the 18th ; and to Saturn on the 26th.

The great event of the month, politically, and perhaps religiously, has taken place. This country, by its representatives, has declared, by a majority of 120, that the Irish Church shall be disendowed and disestablished. There is the fact. What obstructions the bill may meet with in committee remains to be seen. What may be its fate in the House of Lords cannot be predicted with any certainty. The Christian, however, can afford to wait, with the assurance that “The Lord reigneth.”

Though much less in importance, yet the Chancellor's budget shows a breadth of view which we cannot but regard with pleasure. Any thing done which may teach the working man to exercise prudent forethought would remove half the misery which now he suffers. Heretofore, if a man wished to insure his furniture and effects against the risk of fire, he was met with a government duty heavier than the expense of the risk. Mr. Lowe proposes the remission of this duty altogether, and we thank him for it. We hope that our fellow working men will insure their property without any unnecessary delay.

noon.

When we look over our globe, with its moving mass of human beings, we are reminded of the lines of Crabbe: “ Here with an infant joyful sponsors come, Then bear the new-made Christian to his

home. A few short years, and we behold him

stand, To ask a blessing, with his bride in hand. A few still seeming shorter, and we hear His widow weeping at her husband's bier." Such is life. The great thing is to fill up life's short day well, so that the Master of the vineyard may give every one of us his

penny. We would still keep before the minds of our brethren the annual

meeting. We are in a position now to state that many chapels have been placed at the disposal of the Committee on June 6th, for sermons for the Association. If our country brethren come up in the fulness of the blessing of the gospel of peace, there will be congregations in various parts of London to welcome and listen to them.

But we know not what a day may bring forth. There are registered on our pages for January and February the deaths of fourteen of our members or our members' wives. It is possible that some of us, who are calculating on meeting our friends below, called in the interim to join our friends above.

may be

Mutual-Did Association Reporter.

GENERAL COMMITTEE.

upon from Rotherham, Coventry, The monthly meeting was held at Grantham, and Bristol. Brother D. Plant's, 5, Upper Portland Brother W. L., of C., applied for Place, Wandsworth Road, on Mon- help. He is 69 years old, has been a day, April 12th.

preacher for fifty years. Has strugPresent : Brothers Plant (chair), gled to earn his bread as a travelling Durley, Wade 1st, Coman, Harding, tinker and hawker, but has only maChamberlain, Carter, Creswell, Sims, naged to earn about 4s. or 5s. a week, Parker, Jameson, and Salisbury. on the average. He is now assailed

Prayer was offered by the Hono- with rheumatism, has lost his wife, rary Secretary.

has one son living in Manchester, The minutes were read and con- who will find a home for him, but is firmed.

not able to support him entirely. It The monthly abstract showed 5 was resolved that he have three shilmembers dead and 1 wife, 63 sick

lings per week. members, and 94 annuitants.

There was a conversation on magaThe total receipts through local zine affairs; and the Secretary was committees were £1,736 ls. 6d., and instructed to make an estimate of the the total payments £1,503 5s. 6d. cost of printing all Association mat

The Honorary Secretary reported ters in the magazine, and lay the that W. M‘Arthur, Esq., M.P., had same before the annual meeting. consented to take the chair at the

Several Union matters were settled; annual public meeting, King's Cross

and after prayer by Brother Durley, Chapel, June 7th.

the brethren separated. Brothers Durley, Sims, Salisbury,

The next meeting will be at Brother and others reported progress in the Creswell's, Prospect House, Mitcham, arrangements for sermons and accom

on Wednesday, 12th May, at three modation required. After some con- o'clock. sideration, all final determinations were left to next meeting, the brethren

DIED. to assemble at 3 p.m. precisely for that purpose.

March 15, 1869. Daniel Sumner, of

Walsall, aged 61. Claim £6. He has The Treasurer reported that he had been informed of a legacy of £100,

left a delightful testimony of the life

and death of a Christian. left by the late John Whalley, Esq., March 24, 1869. Charles Smith, of of Stockton-on-Tees.

Derby, aged 51. Claim £6. His end Letters were read and determined

was peace.

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