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go to the last chapter, and quote a is it we teetotalers want? The good passage, 'If you add one word to, or wine! But there is so much bad that diminish,'—you know the rest. Paul we wish to exterminate. Would to never recommended Timothy to take God the wine of the present day was wine; he simply recommended him to as good and pure in its nature as use a little for his peculiar infirmity. that which Christ made at the feast Using in emergency and taking habit- of Cana of Galilee. I cannot imagine ually are very different things. But that the Saviour who came as a ranyet, in order to see the full meaning of som for fallen man, who left His the apostle's advice, we must go back Father's throne to become a pilgrim to the time when the recommendation on earth, who left glory to be a man was given. At that time, there were of sorrows and acquainted with grief, wines nearly solid, and that were for and who had nowhere to lay His outward application. There were head, who had nothing in the shape wines to be rubbed into the skin, and of luxury, and who came to teach there were wines that were taken like man the great lesson of self-denialjam, and not in liquid.

I cannot believe that that is a man say,

- That is another teetotal eva- who would supply persons who had sion; that is begging the question.' been feasting and drinking for some That I deny. It is you who strain days previously with a liquid which the texts of Scripture to suit your would make them still more drunk. perverted appetites and tastes. You My Christianity cannot allow me for may say,

“ Give me an instance of an a moment to entertain such an idea. outward application.” We have all I cannot make my Saviour into a read of the man who went down from wine merchant, whatever you can do Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among

I can do the reverse, thieves ; and how, being left wounded, and I can say that His life, character, the priest and the Levite passed by teachings, and actions, from the manon the other side; and how the Sama- ger to the cross, teach me that he ritan pitied and relieved him. How would not such an action as that did he do this? The good Samaritan

at which I have hinted, and if you poured oil and wine into his wounds, have one spark of true Christian love not down his throat. Bear that in it is the conclusion you must come to. mind, and study it out to its legiti- Let us bear this in mind, whatever mate conclusion; and remember that may have been the state in early by the researches of Dr. Lees we have Christian times, the Bible should not learned that the wine recommended be quoted in support of the greatest to Timothy by Paul was almost a solid

a

evil of the day-an evil that is blightsubstance. Then, again, before you ing every moral and religious effort take wine on this account, you must that is put forth. There never was a prove to me that you are in the same time when this evil was greater. He state that Timothy was.

We have who runs may read that. That which no proof that Timothy took Paul's is ruining men for time and for eteradvice; nor have we any account that nity is intoxicating drink. Go where Timothy became a wine-bibber. You you will, everywhere men are being who cannot take a meal without cursed by it, homes are being made having a glass of wine, must prove to miserable, churches are being decime that Timothy became like you, mated, our pulpits are being deprived that wherever he went, he carried of some of their brightest ornaments, Paul's advice with him, and persis- our schools are ill-attended, and, in tently and continuously drank wine short, in any attempt we make, drink for his stomach's sake and his often starts up and stops the way. Surely infirmities.

But you say, 'Didn't all this teaches us, whatever flimsy our Saviour turn water into wine?' objections we may have to TeetotalTrue; but have we not the testimony ism, there is this truth that outweighs of the governor of the feast that it all that can be put against it, that was better than the wine which had those who wish to do right must live been used previously?

Thou hast right, and that those that wish to do kept the good wine until now. What good, must take care to put away that

a

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which is evil, and live in harmony Though thoughts like light-winged with truth. And, ladies and gentle- lightnings run, men, there is one grand truth that Surveying planets, stars, and sun, lies at the root of the Temperance

Their distance, nature, size, to tell question, that, whoever the man may

How far from heaven, how far from hell,

And if, like man, they ever fell. be that adopts its principle, whatever

Nor can he with the present stay, his station in life, it makes that posi

For history calls his thoughts away ; tion better. Temperance adds lustre Its rising wonders to survey: to the brightest character; it elevates And daring on that track goes forth, the most degraded, debases and en- To know of old creation's birth; slaves none; but it is rather a charter How all that is, or th' past e'er knew, of freedom, a principle of liberty, From nothing into something grew; and is in harmony with God's im- But know, where'er his thoughts may mutable laws, and with truth itself roam, (loud cheers). Teetotalism will live He sees a God, and is at home : when all your objections will have

His yearning spirit pants to see

God in his own immensity. passed away and been forgotten, and will win for itself one day the power

Though these high thoughts Tom's of overturning the drink error, and vision fill, assisting to bring about that glorious He knows he is a cobbler still; time when righteousness shall And with these soul-ennobling views, cover the earth as the waters cover Pays prompt attention to his shoes. the deep.'”Temperance Star.

The self-same soul that mounts the skies
His humble stall with skill supplies;

And quite familiar with his kit,
Poetry.

He shapes the shoes to make them fit.

While worlds with worlds he seeks to LEAVES FROM A NOTE BOOK ON

join, THE CHARACTER OF MEN And man with God would fain combine, AND THINGS.

His sole he beats to suit the tread,

And draws well waxed his flaxen thread. No. 3.-TOM THE COBBLER. His face is dirty, hands are rough, Sweet humble thoughts, on heavenly His clothing made of common stuff, things, And so put on, 'tis scarcely known, Go from his mind, and open springs If made for him, or if his own.

Of rapture, till at times he knows, His manners too, none can deny,

Scarce where he nails or how he sews; Are quite uncouth to courtly eye. And feels, while shoe he's polishing, He works away ; is quite at ease All sin he is abolishing. Whether he anger, or he please,

- Yet this is but occasional, Or rather seems to use no skill

When promptly he himself will call To shun your hate, or gain good-will. To earthly work. They are like chinks Though often prest with company, That let in such bright light, that Tom is his own society.

blinks 'Tis not his purposes that stir

His mental vision; then no wonder, His mood to be thus singular ;

'Tween shoes and heaven if he should It is the instinct of his heart

blunder. That leads, without the aid of art.

When Tom the Cobbler's in your view, When most Tom in this mood appears,

Please let him have the merit due; He is the butt of workmen's jeers. Nor meanly his high stall enthral, No matter; give they praise or blame, Though seated on a cobbler's stall. Unmoved, Tom goes on just the same. His soul is mighty, and would grace, They wonder, and are oft perplext, High science in its highest place; That Tom like them should not be vext; Such were the flights of Cobbler Drew, The more of him they daily see

Of Gifford, and of Carey too : But deepens their perplexity.

Men who, though born in nature's

shade, Tom mends his shoes, but mind's strong Have sunlight paths in learning made. wings

They live inquiring minds to show, Oft bear him up to higher things; How deep, how high the mind can go; And in the adventures of his mind, That ties of poverty but lend He leaves the shoes and shop behind. A stronger impulse to ascend. Τ. Η.

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with yours.

go to the last chapter, and quote a is it we teetotalers want? The good passage, 'If you add one word to, or wine! But there is so much bad that diminish,'—you know the rest. Paul we wish to exterminate. Would to never recommended Timothy to take God the wine of the present day was wine ; he simply recommended him to as good and pure in its nature as use a little for his peculiar infirmity. that which Christ made at the feast Using in emergency and taking habit- of Cana of Galilee. I cannot imagine ually are very different things. But that the Saviour who came as a ranyet, in order to see the full meaning of som for fallen man, who left His the apostle's advice, we must go back Father's throne to become a pilgrim to the time when the recommendation on earth, who left glory to be a man was given. At that time, there were of sorrows and acquainted with grief, wines nearly solid, and that were for and who had nowhere to lay His outward application.

There were head, who had nothing in the shape wines to be rubbed into the skin, and of luxury, and who came to teach there were wines that were taken like man the great lesson of self-denialjam, and not in liquid. You may

I cannot believe that that is a man say, "That is another teetotal eva- who would supply persons who had sion; that is begging the question.' been feasting and drinking for some That I deny.

It is you who strain days previously with a liquid which the texts of Scripture to suit your

would make them still more drunk. perverted appetites and tastes. You My Christianity cannot allow me for may say,

Give me an instance of an a moment to entertain such an idea. outward application.” We have all I cannot make my Saviour into a read of the man who went down from wine merchant, whatever you can do Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among

I can do the reverse, thieves; and how, being left wounded, and I can say that His life, character, the priest and the Levite passed by teachings, and actions, from the manon the other side; and how the Sama- ger to the cross, teach me that he ritan pitied and relieved him. How would not do such an action as that did he do this? The good Samaritan at which I have hinted, and if you poured oil and wine into his wounds, have one spark of true Christian love not down his throat. Bear that in it is the conclusion you must come to. mind, and study it out to its legiti- Let us bear this in mind, whatever mate conclusion; and remember that may have been the state in early by the researches of Dr. Lees we have Christian times, the Bible should not learned that the wine recommended be quoted in support of the greatest to Timothy by Paul was almost a solid evil of the day-an evil that is blightsubstance. Then, again, before you ing every moral and religious effort take wine on this account, you must that is put forth. There never was a prove to me that you are in the same time when this evil was greater. He state that Timothy was.

We have who runs may read that. That which no proof that Timothy took Paul's is ruining men for time and for eteradvice; nor have we any account that nity is intoxicating drink. Go where Timothy became a wine-bibber. You you will, everywhere men are being who cannot take a meal without cursed by it, homes are being made having a glass of wine, must prove to miserable, churches are being decime that Timothy became like you, mated, our pulpits are being deprived that wherever he went, he carried of some of their brightest ornaments, Paul's advice with him, and persis- our schools are ill-attended, and, in tently and continuously drank wine short, in any attempt we make, drink for his stomach's sake and his often starts up and stops the way. Surely infirmities.

But you say, 'Didn't all this teaches us, whatever flimsy our Saviour turn water into wine?' objections we may have to Teetotal

but have we not the testimony ism, there is this truth that outweighs of the governor of the feast that it all that can be put against it, that was better than the wine which had those who wish to do right must live been used previously?

• Thou hast right, and that those that wish to do kept the good wine until now.' What good, must take care to put away that

True;

which is evil, and live in harmony Though thoughts like light-winged with truth. And, ladies and gentle- lightnings run, men, there is one grand truth that Surveying planets, stars, and sun, lies at the root of the Temperance

Their distance, nature, size, to tell question, that, whoever the man may

How far from heaven, how far from hell, be that adopts its principle, whatever

And if, like man, they ever fell.

Nor can he with the present stay, his station in life, it makes that posi

For history calls his thoughts away ; tion better. Temperance adds lustre

Its rising wonders to survey: to the brightest character; it elevates

And daring on that track goes forth, the most degraded, debases and en- To know of old creation's birth; slaves none; but it is rather a charter How all that is, or th' past e'er knew, of freedom, a principle of liberty, From nothing into something grew; and is in harmony with God's im- But know, where'er his thoughts may mutable laws, and with truth itself roam, (loud cheers). Teetotalism will live He sees a God, and is at home : when all your objections will have

His yearning spirit pants to see

God in his own immensity. passed away and been forgotten, and will win for itself one day the power Though these high thoughts Tom's of overturning the drink error, and vision fill, assisting to bring about that glorious He knows he is a cobbler still; time * when righteousness shall And with these soul-ennobling views, cover the earth as the waters cover Pays prompt attention to his shoes. the deep.'"- Temperance Star.

The self-same soul that mounts the skies
His humble stall with skill supplies;

And quite familiar with his kit,
Poetry.

He shapes the shoes to make them fit.

While worlds with worlds he seeks to LEAVES FROM A NOTE BOOK ON

join, THE CHARACTER OF MEN And man with God would fain combine, AND THINGS.

His sole he beats to suit the tread,

And draws well waxed his flaxen thread. No. 3.-TOM THE COBBLER. His face is dirty, hands are rough, Sweet humble thoughts, on heavenly His clothing made of common stuff, things, And so put on, 'tis scarcely known, Go from his mind, and open springs If made for him, or if his own.

Of rapture, till at times he knows, His manners too, none can deny,

Scarce where he nails or how he sews ; Are quite uncouth to courtly eye. And feels, while shoe he's polishing, He works away ; is quite at ease All sin he is abolishing. Whether he anger, or he please,- Yet this is but occasional, Or rather seems to use no skill

When promptly he himself will call To shun your hate, or gain good-will. To earthly work. They are like chinks Though often prest with company, That let in such bright light, that Tom is his own society.

blinks 'Tis not his purposes that stir

His mental vision; then no wonder, His mood to be thus singular ;

'Tween shoes and heaven if he should It is the instinct of his heart

blunder. That leads, without the aid of art.

When Tom the Cobbler's in your view, When most Tom in this mood appears,

Please let him have the merit due; He is the butt of workmen's jeers. Nor meanly his high stall enthral, No matter; give they praise or blame, Though seated on a cobbler's stall. Unmoved, Tom goes on just the same.

His soul is mighty, and would grace, They wonder, and are oft perplext, High science in its highest place; That Tom like them should not be vext; Such were the flights of Cobbler Drew, The more of him they daily see

Of Gifford, and of Carey too : But deepens their perplexity.

Men who, though born in nature's

shade, Tom mends his shoes, but mind's strong Have sunlight paths in learning made. wings

They live inquiring minds to show, Oft bear him up to higher things; How deep, how high the mind can go; And in the adventures of his mind, That ties of poverty but lend He leaves the shoes and shop behind. A stronger impulse to ascend. T.H

Choice Selections.

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LAST HOURS OF THE VEN. AND REV.

JOHN KNOX. On the 24th November, 1572, the pious, learned, and zealous John Knox departed this life. The night before he died he sighed much in his sleep; and when he awoke, Campbell and John Johnston, who attended him, having asked him the reason, he answered, “In my time, I have been often assaulted by Satan, and oft he hath cast my sins in my teeth, to bring me into despair; but God gave me grace to overcome all his temptations. And now that subtle serpent hath taken another course. He seeks to persuade me that my labours in my ministry, and the fidelity I have shown in that service have merited heaven and immortality. But, blessed be God, who brought to my mind these scriptures, What hast thou that thou hast not received?' and, “Not I, but the grace of God in me;' with which he is gone away ashamed, and shall no more return. And now I am sure my battle is at an end, and that without pain of body or trouble of spirit, I shall shortly change this mortal life for that happy immortal life." After prayer he was asked whether he heard it. He replied, “ Would God that ye had heard with such an ear and heart as I have." Then he said, Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.” After which, be spake no more, but without any emotion resigned his soul into the hands of his God and Father.”Crookshank's History of the Church of Scotland.

days. I went to see him; and meeting one of his friends coming out, I asked, “How is Mr. S.?' He answered, • Almost gone.' I said, 'Has the physician been here this morning? 'Yes.' 'Did you ask him seriously his opinion?' 'Yes, I did. “What did he say?' 'He had no hope; adding, it was a million to one if he recovered. I answered, “If the one be God's, will outweigh the physician's million.' I went straight upstairs to his bedroom, and found him scarcely able to speak. I thought, • What a pity so good and useful a man should die, particularly in the present weak state of the society! I will wrestle with God for his life. I did so; and while praying, these words came with mighty power into my mind : “He shall not die, but live, and show forth the glory of God.'

In that moment I knew he would recover, and said to him, 'My brother, God will raise you up; this sickness is not unto death.' Those around me in the room seemed astonished at me. In that hour he began to amend, and, I believe, was a steady, consistent, useful member of Society to the end of his life."--Rev. Samuel Dunn's Life of Dr. Clarke, pages 119-20.

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AN INTERESTING FACT.

(James v. 14-16.) In prayer, Dr. Adam Clarke had power with God, and prevailed. Here is an instance, which we give in his own words. “ John Sewell, a class leader, in Yarmouth, a warm friend of the cause, and an excellent man, had a very bad typhus fever, and there was no hope of his life. When I was in the circuit, I happened to come into Yarmouth when he was given over by his physicians. They had been expecting his death some

THE FAITHFUL MINISTER. THE true minister lives less for the present than for the future. He has eternity in his eye. The celebrated remark of an ancient painter, “I paint for eternity,” has more of the shadow than the substance of the sublime, for it contemplated only a fancied life in others' breath. But on the lips of a Christian minister, a similar sentiment has all the beauty and grace of simple truth. He lives and acts, he preaches and prays for eternity; and millions of ages hence, his life and actions, his sermons and his prayers, may be remembered by beings besides himself, with unutterable joy or grief. This is enough. The minister who forgets this may be a trifler, and will be a trifler. He may trifle formally and gravely, but he will trifle stili. The minister to whom this single vast idea is habitually present, as a reality, may trifle if he can. But it is impossible. He will be serious, engaged, devoted, absorbed, -absorbed in the

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