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the 20th to the 23rd, 49; from the

Passing Ebents. 24th to the 27th, 48; and from the 28th to the 31st, 47 degrees. The

The failure of the “ Albert Insurance average rainfall in October for seven years has been about 2.6 inches. In

Officesustains the view taken by the 1867 the average was nearly seven

poet:tenths of an inch less, although there

"He builds too low was rain on sixteen days.

.Who builds beneath the sky." The sun rises on the 1st at one In this failure comes out this sad minute after six, and sets at twenty fact, that moral honesty is miserably minutes before six; on the 15th it low where it ought to be of the highest rises at twenty-five minutes after six, order. Wherever there is trust, the and sets at six minutes after five; on trusted should be above all suspicion. the 31st it rises at seven minutes Hundreds of provident husbands and before seven, and sets at twenty-six fathers have been paying into insurminutes before five. The mornings ance offices, that their families might decrease fifty-four minutes, and the have a provision, in case they should evenings one hour and six minutes ; be taken away. Many persons have so that we shall have two hours less held back from insurance offices, daylight on the last day of October when they have looked at the large than on the last day of September. sums paid for establishments, maThe moon is new on the 5th at

nagers, secretaries, agents, advertisetwenty minutes after two in the after- ments, &c.; and if 10s. out of 20s. go noon, and full on the 20th at three

in expenses, it will induce many minutes before two in the afternoon. others to pause before they insure. On the first Sunday it rises in the In • The United Methodist Free early morning, and sets in the after- Churches' Assembly," this year, there noon; on the second Sunday it sets at was a lengthened discussion whether eighteen minutes before nine at night; the Mission in Ireland should be conon the third Sunday it rises at about tinued or not. The society there had half-past four in the afternoon ; on the been for thirty years a constant drain fourth Sunday it rises at thirty-seven upon the funds of the connexion, with minutes after sunset, and shines all

very slight results. This would not night; and on the fifth Sunday it have been of sufficient importance to again rises in the early morning, and be noticed by us, had it not been for sets in the afternoon.

certain facts which came out in the The moon is near to Mercury on discussion. Mr. Myers is reported the 6th, to Mars on the 8th, to Venus to have said, “ That, having been apon the same day, to Saturn on the pointed to investigate the mission 9th, to Jupiter on the 22nd, to Alde- stations there, he found that the peobaran on the 23rd, to Uranus on the ple had no confidence in the local27th, and to Regulus on the 29th. preaching element.” Mr. T. Newton

Mercury is an evening star until said, “It was time to abandon Carthe 16th, after which it sets before the rickfergus, when they had tried it for

thirty years, and expended a sum of Venus is an evening star, setting fifty pounds a year over it. Though an hour after the sun on the 1st, and poor, and not prepared to pay for one hour and forty-four minutes after ministerial assistance, they would not it on the 31st. It is in conjunction listen to local preachers; and when with Mars on the morning of the 6th, he was there, and wished to go away and with Saturn on the morning of on any particular Sabbath, he was the 26th.

obliged to do so very quietly, Mars is an evening star, setting chapel would have been deserted." about an hour and a quarter after the There is nothing in the remarks of

these two itinerants to show that Jupiter rises shortly after sunset, their local brethren in Ireland were and is visible all night.

below the standard in character and Saturn sets about two hours after ability of local preachers elsewhere.

How was it, then, that there was no

sun.

or the

sun.

the sun

Such teaching doth God's word dispense all things beautiful? There are few

O’er man's most holy thought; sights in your town-house more cheerAnd lessons of his providence,

ful than a sudden burst of sun into Which daily we are taught.

the room, smiting the floor into so Who wins the prize must run the race; many windows, and making the roses To conquer, we must fight;

on the very carpet look as if they felt And who the heavenly way would trace, it. Let them fade in good season as Must walk by heavenly light.

the others do; and make up for the Doth God require consistency,

expense, dear fashionable people, by And o'er man's falsehoods grieve? staying a little more at home, keeping And will He mock integrity,

better hours, and saving the roses on And helpless man deceive?

your cheeks.Leigh Hunt. Will He before man's anxious eyes Hold out a crown of bliss,

FAMILY PRAYER. And all his efforts tantalise

ROBERT Hall, hearing some worldlyWith what can ne'er be his?

minded persons object to family prayer Forbid it, Lord ! we humbly cry, as taking up too much time, said that

Who bliss to all wouldst give: what might seem a loss will be more Forbid it! Thou who ne'er canst die, than compensated by that spirit of And will'st that all may live.

order and regularity which the stated T. H. observance of this duty tends to pro

duce. It serves as an edge and border, Choice Selections.

to preserve the web of life from unravelling. “The curse of the Lord is

in the house of the wicked; but he AN OBEDIENT CHILD.

blesseth the habitation of the just.” No object is more pleasing than a meek and obedient child. It reflects

LOVE CHILDREN.
its
parents, for their wise

We have heard of taking blood from management. It enjoys much ease the veins of a young person, and inand pleasure, to the utmost limit of jecting it into the veins of the aged inwhat it is fit. It promises excellence valid. There are two ways of doing it and usefulness, to be, when age has —the one is purely mechanical, the matured the human understanding, a other is spiritual. By entering into a willing subject in all things to the

full sympathy with the spirit of a child, government of God. No object, on one feels that young blood has entered the contrary, is more shocking than a his veins. When children are innochild under no management. We pity cently at play, enjoy their mirth, orphans who have neither father nor

checking it only when it annoys the mother to care for them. A child

unsympathişing, or is rude and boisindulged is more to be pitied; it has

terous. Take pleasure in the trifles no parent; it is its own master

that amuse them, for their sakes, and peevish, forward, headstrong, blind

because they afford them pleasure. born to a double portion of trouble You will thus catch the contagion and sorrow, above what fallen man is of their youthful feelings. heir to; not only miserable itself, but worthless, and a plague to all who in future will be connected with it.

Phenomena of the Months.

honour upon

SUNSHINE IN PARLOURS. THE horror of a sunshine by no means too abundant in this region, has more to do with the fear of discoloured curtains and carpets than it ought to have, especially among the rich. What signifies the flying of a few colours, easily replaced, compared with the giving a proper welcome to the great colourer himself—the sun, that makes

OCTOBER The average fall of the temperature this month reaches eight degrees, as shown by tables compiled on the observations of fifty years. From the 1st to the 4th the average is 54 degrees Fahr.; on the 5th and 6th it is 53 degrees; from the 7th to the 11th, 52; on the 12th and 13th, 51; from the 14th to the 18th, 50; from

the 20th to the 23rd, 49 ; from the

Passing Events. 24th to the 27th, 48; and from the 28th to the 31st, 47 degrees. The

The failure of the “ Albert Insurance average rainfall in October for seven

Officesustains the view taken by the years has been about 2.6 inches. In 1867 the average was nearly seven

poet:tenths of an inch less, although there

“ He builds too low was rain on sixteen days.

Who builds beneath the sky." The sun rises on the 1st at one In this failure comes out this sad minute after six, and sets at twenty fact, that moral honesty is miserably minutes before six; on the 15th it low where it ought to be of the highest rises at twenty-five minutes after six, order. Wherever there is trust, the and sets at six minutes after five ; on trusted should be above all suspicion. the 31st it rises at seven minutes Hundreds of provident husbands and before seven, and sets at twenty-six fathers have been paying into insurminutes before five. The mornings ance offices, that their families might decrease fifty-four minutes, and the have a provision, in case they should evenings one hour and six minutes ; be taken away. Many persons have so that we shall have two hours less held back from insurance offices, daylight on the last day of October

when they have looked at the large than on the last day of September. sums paid for establishments, maThe moon is new on the 5th at

nagers, secretaries, agents, advertisetwenty minutes after two in the after- ments, &c.; and if 10s. out of 20s. go noon, and full on the 20th at three

in expenses, it will induce many minutes before two in the afternoon.

others to pause before they insure. On the first Sunday it rises in the In “ The United Methodist Free early morning, and sets in the after- Churches' Assembly," this year, there noon; on the second Sunday it sets at was a lengthened discussion whether eighteen minutes before nine at night; the Mission in Ireland should be conon the third Sunday it rises at about tinued or not. The society there had half-past four in the afternoon ; on the been for thirty years a constant drain fourth Sunday it rises at thirty-seven upon the funds of the connexion, with minutes after sunset, and shines all very slight results. This would not night; and on the fifth Sunday it have been of sufficient importance to again rises in the early morning, and be noticed by us, had it not been for sets in the afternoon.

certain facts which came out in the The moon is near to Mercury on discussion. Mr. Myers is reported the 6th, to Mars on the 8th, to Venus to have said, “ That, having been apon the same day, to Saturn on the pointed to investigate the mission 9th, to Jupiter on the 22nd, to Alde- stations there, he found that the peobaran on the 23rd, to Uranus on the ple had no confidence in the local27th, and to Regulus on the 29th. preaching element.” Mr. T. Newton

Mercury is an evening star until said, “It was time to abandon Carthe 16th, after which it sets before the rickfergus, when they had tried it for

thirty years, and expended a sum of Venus is an evening star, setting fifty pounds a year over it. Though an hour after the sun on the 1st, and poor, and not prepared to pay for one hour and forty-four minutes after ministerial assistance, they would not it on the 31st. It is in conjunction listen to local preachers; and when with Mars on the morning of the 6th, he was there, and wished to go away and with Saturn on the morning of on any particular Sabbath, he was the 26th.

obliged to do so very quietly, or the Mars is an evening star, setting chapel would have been deserted.”. about an hour and a quarter after the There is nothing in the remarks of

these two itinerants to show that Jupiter rises shortly after sunset, their local brethren in Ireland were and is visible all night.

below the standard in character and Saturn sets about two hours after ability of local preachers elsewhere.

How was it, then, that there was no

sun.

sun.

the sun,

I must confess that I have not much faith in the use of sketches made ready to hand; for if a preacher cannot draw the outlines of

his discourse, how is it likely he will be able to fill up properly the outlines drawn by another hand ?

Philos.

Mutual-Aid Association Reporter.

There was

same.

with prayer.

BIRMINGHAM.

paper. That they be circulated, as On Sunday, July 4th, 1869, the Rev.

last year, gratuitously, in proper proJ. Warwick, of the “United Me- portions, to each branch, according thodist Free Church," preached a to the number of its members and sermon on behalf of the Association, contributors. That 1,000 copies be in Rocky Lane chapel, Birmingham. left in the hands of Brother Parker

a fair attendance, and for more private distribution by the £1 28. 8}d. was collected for our aged Committee and others. and sick brethren.

One claim for superannuation alH. C., Local Secretary. lowance was deferred for further

particulars. GENERAL COMMITTEE.

The monthly statement showed but The monthly meeting was held at few alterations during the month, and Bro. John Carter's, the Vale, Chelsea, the balance in hand was nearly the on Wednesday, 8th September.

There were ninety-eight anPresent, the following brethren: nuitants, and fifty-three sick, receivThe President, Treasurer, Honorary ing relief from the funds. Secretary, P. Parker, J. Wade ist, Brother Parker said that a gentleG. Sims, Coman, and W. Jameson. man, to whom he had sent two Brother Sims opened the meeting magazines and other papers, explain

ing our work, had called upon him, It was explained that, owing to and given him five pounds for the Brother Gully's absence from town, Association. the Treasurer had kindly fixed the Brother Sims paid in six guineas meeting at his house on the present which he had obtained for our funds. occasion.

A conversation took place on ways The Honorary Secretary reported and means. the sudden and severe illness of Bro- The free contributions already rether Creswell, the General Secretary, ceived being £301 19s. 3d., various and explained that he had superin- suggestions were made, in order to tended the necessary work since; raise some £700 more during the and, if the Committee thought well,

financial year.

(1.) It was hoped he would continue to do so for the that the local officers would endeapresent, in the hope that Brother vour to hold meetings, or obtain colCreswell would be restored to health lections after sermons, in all the again.

circuits; and in every such case the It was hereupon resolved, That the Committee would provide a deputaHonorary Secretary take the over- tion from its body, if desired. (2.) sight of the General Secretary's The President thought that £10,000 duties until it be seen how the Lord at least ought to be secured, and be will deal with him; and that an ex- added to the invested capital. He pression of the Committee's sincere believed that one collection made in sympathy be sent to our brother in every Wesleyan Chapel in the kinghis affliction.

dom would produce that sum, and Some minor matters, arising out of the minutes, were discussed. The The meeting closed with prayer by proofs of the Annual Report, with all Brother Coman. the required statistics, were laid be- The next meeting will be held at fore the Committee.

Brother Gully's, 3, Montague Place, It was ordered, That 3,000 copies, Poplar, near Poplar Church, on Monwith wrapper, be printed on good day, 11th October, at 5 p.m.

more.

Satan nor sin can have any part. If men, slighting their own mercies, cry out, This is impossible !-whom does this arguing reprove ?-God, who, on this ground, has given a command, the fulfilment of which is impossible. “But who can bring a clean out of an unclean thing ? God Almighty-and, however inveterate the disease of sin may be, the grace of the Lord Jesus can fully cure it; and who will say, that He who laid down His life for our souls will not use His power completely to effect that salvation which He has died to procure? “But where is the person thus saved ? Wherever he is found who loves God with all his heart, soul, mind, and strength, and his neighbour as himself; and, for the honour of Christianity and its Author, may we not hope there are many such in the Church of God, not known indeed by any profession of this kind which they make, but by a surer testimony, that of uniformly holy tempers, piety to God, and beneficence to man.”

“ Christian perfection,” says John Fletcher, " is a spiritual constellation made up of these gracious stars, Perfect Repentance, Perfect Faith, Perfect Humility, Perfect Meekness, Perfect Self-denial, Perfect Resignation, Perfect Hope, Perfect Charity for our visible enemies as well as for our earthly relations; and, above all, Perfect Love for our invisible God."

Than John Fletcher, no man was better qualified to speak and write on this great doctrine. Mr. Wesley says of him, “I was intimately acquainted with him for above thirty years. I conversed with him morning, noon, and night, without the least reserve, during a journey of many hundred miles. And in all that time, I never heard him speak one improper word, nor saw him do an improper action. To conclude, many exemplary men have I known-holy in heart and life, within fourscore years; but one equal to him I have not known-one so inwardly and outwardly devoted to God. So unblamable a character, in every respect, I have not found, either in Europe or America. Nor do I expect to find another such, on this side of eternity." (Wesley's Life of Fletcher.)

The doctrine of entire sanctification being taught in the Bible, woe be unto us, as preachers, if we blot it out of our creed. Woe be unto us, too, if we strive not earnestly to attain it, that our own hearts may

be emptied of sin, and filled with God. Woe be unto us, likewise, if we never bring it forward in our preaching. “Shall I preach the doctrine?" inquired yne of the Methodist preachers of John Wesley," if I don't experience it myself ?” “Yes," answered Wesley; "preach it till you get it, and then preach it because you have it.” No man can reach a high eminence unless he aims high. This is specially the case in reference to this doctrine. We cannot aim higher in our experience than loving God with all our heart, soul, mind, and strength. Lower than this.we should not aim. We cannot serve God more perfectly on earth than angels do in heaven. But this is the rule of service laid down by our divine Master, in the prayer which we have uttered from childhood, “ Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.”

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