An Elementary Arithmetic Designed for Academies and Schools: Also Serving as an Introduction to the Higher Arithmetic

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D. Appleton & Company, 1851 - Arithmetic - 347 pages
 

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Page 111 - When a decimal number is to be divided by 10, 100, 1000, &c., remove the decimal point as many places to the left as there are ciphers in the divisor, and if there be not figures enough in the number, prefix ciphers.
Page 107 - To multiply a decimal by 10, 100, 1000, &c., remove the decimal point as many places to the right as there are ciphers in the multiplier ; and if there be not places enough in the number, annex ciphers.
Page 237 - If there be after payments made, compute the interest on the balance due to the next payment, and then deduct the payment as above ; and, in like manner, from one payment to another, till all the payments are absorbed ; provided the time between one payment and another be one year or more.
Page 78 - Then multiply all the numerators together for a new numerator, and all the denominators together for a new denominator...
Page 151 - Place the remainder under the column added, and carry the quotient to the next column.
Page 29 - EXAMPLES. 1. In which no figure of the subtrahend is larger than the corresponding figure in the minuend. From 796 subtract 375.
Page 330 - To find the area of a trapezoid. RULE. Multiply half the sum of the two parallel sides by the perpendicular distance between them : the product will be the area.
Page 112 - TABLE. 10 Mills (m.) = 1 Cent . . ct. 10 Cents = 1 Dime . . d. 10 Dimes = 1 Dollar . $. 10 Dollars = 1 Eagle . E.
Page 108 - ... it follows, that in division the decimal places of the dividend must be equal to the number of places in the divisor and quotient taken together. Hence, the number of decimal places in the quotient must equal the excess of those in the dividend above those in the divisor.
Page 107 - In multiplication of decimals, we know that the number of decimal places in the product is equal to the sum of those in both the factors.

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