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6 Let others hail the rising sun, We bow to those whose race is run,

And set in endless night."

For the sake of rational amusement, we should say, late may Mr Mathews retire from public life. Retire when he will, he will carry with him the admiration and esteem of every lover of the Drama, whom his truly versatile pow. ers have so long contributed to amuse.

D

-G.

11

Costume.

MONSIEUR MORBLEU.-Striped coat with large buttons, white

waistcoat embroidered, red breeches, striped stockings, shoes, and buckles.

MR. THOMPSON.-Slate colour coat, embroidered waistcoat, slate

colour breeches, white stockings, shoes, and buckles. TOM KING.-Fashionable frock coat and waistcoat, white cord

breeches, and top-boots.

JACK ARDOURLY.--Blue coat, white waistcoat, and trowsers.

RUSTY.Brown coat and breeches, red waistcoat.

white

USEFUL.-Light blue livery jacket, striped waistcoat,

breeches, and top-boots. NAP.- Watchman's coat and red night-cap.

TRAP & WANTEM.-Frock coats, red waistcoats, drab breeches

and gaiters.

FIP.-Brown fashionable coat, white waistcoat, and striped trowsers.

WAITER.-Blue coat, striped waistcoat, white breeches, and stock

ings.

ADOLPHINE.-A white leno morning dress, white chip hat.

MADAME BELLEGARDE.Embroidered satin gown, red petti

coat with furbelows, a high French car, and high heel shocs.

MRS. THOMPSON.-A white inuslin pelisse, fashionable bon

net, scarf, &c.

12

Cast of the Characters as Performed at the Theatres Royal.

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The Conductors of this Work print no Plays but those which they have seen acted. The Stage Directions are given from their own personal observations, during the most recent performances.

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EXITS and ENTRANCES.
R. means Right; L. Left; D. F. Door in Flat ; R. D. Right Door ;
L. D. Left Door; S. E. Second Entrance ; U. E. Upper Entrance ;
M. D. Middle Door.

RELATIVE POSITIONS.
R. means Right; L. Left; C. Centre; R. C. Right of Centre;
1. C. Left of Centre.
** The Reader is supposed to be on the Stage facing the Audience.
R.
RC..

C.
LC.

L.

T. King

Det in the

hise Cupid

MONSIEUR TONSON.

ACT I.

once

niore.

SCENE J.-Hart Street, Bloomsbury. Evening.

Enter ADOLPHINE, hastily, L. Adol. Am I in safety? (Looking round.] Yes; I have, at length, eluded my pursuer. Unfortunate Adolphine ! Is it not enough that I am an emigrant from my native France ; that an inpenetrable mystery hangs over my birth; that I am only prevented being wholly dependant ou the meagre exertions of one as wretched as myself, for support, by the sale of a few trifling drawings ; but whenever, as now, I venture out, I must be the sport and prey of every libertine I meet? (Noise without, L.) Ah! let me fly! he is here again! Wretched, wretched girl! (Exit, hastily.

Enter ARDOURLY, in pursuit, L. Ard. Confusion ! she has escaped me What an unlucky dog I am! to behold the only object ! feel I can ever love, merely to lose her. Never did tormenting fate lead a man astray with such beauteous will.n' the wisps, as those piercing sparklers and twinkling little feet of her's. She's lost-i'm lost-we're both lost. What the devil shall I do? D---e, I'll raise a hue and cry—I'll—but no, I'll not give her up. Yet, which way has she gone? which way must I go ? Here's a stranger coming, I'll inquire if he has seen her.

Enter Tom KING, R. Pray, sir, have you seen a young woman !-Eh? why, zounds ! 'tis my old friend, Tom King.

T. King. What, Jack Ardourly! inquiring after a petticoat in the neighbourhood of Monmouth-strect? We shall have Cupid turning old clothesman next. But, egad' my dear lad, I'm devilish glad to see you, Why, I haven't had the pleasure of meeting with you since your rich uncle, old Thoinson, popped so suddenly from the clouds, and made

B

you presumptive heir to one of the first fortunes in the three kingdoms; I congratulate you, faith!

Ard. Congratulate me! pity me. What's the finding an old uncle, to the losing au angelic girl ? What's the favour of fortune to the malice of fate? I am the most mi. serable dog in existence !

T. King. Miserable about a wench! muslin-struck, quite. Ha! ha! ha! Some tea-drinking inilliner, I warjant her ; playing at hide and seek to some wealthy fool to wed her. Was there ever such folly ? Oh! Jack Ardourly, Jack Ardourly!

Ard. Langh at me, if you please, but hear me. If love is a folly, it is one I am up to my neck in. Ten minutes since, my heart was as free as your's ; but, as the mischievous spirit of Cupid would have it, making a short cut from Long's, I met a lovely girl, who instantaneously effected a conquest of me; I started my fair game in Soho, she declined my attentions in Greek-street, bade me leave her in the most imperative mood imaginable ; assumed tragedy airs in Berwick-street, gave me the slip in Cran-bourn-alley, and was lost in St. Martiu's-lane. I tracked the dear angel again in St. Giles's, but again parted with her aud my heart in

T. King. Hart-street, Bloomsbury-square. Ha! ha! This is whimsical epough : but what sort of a divinity is this walking Venus, this flying goddess, this hunting Diana, of your's ?

Ard. Her dress and manners are evidently French, but her person is heavenly ; her

T. King. Ah! I see ; one of those pretty emigrants we have lately imported from Paris, with other French toys, to adorn our streets and amuse our leisure hours. I'll soon rout her for you, niy boy! we'll set out on a voyage of discovery directly. What latitude did she sail in?

Ard. I last missed her in this direction. (Pointing off, R.

T'. King. Allons ! then ; you shall find me as sharp as a needle, in guiding you to this polar star of beauty of your's. We'll search every Frenchmau's house in London, but we'll find her. We'll rummage Paddington, rout out Pancras, peep into Pentonville, summons Clerkenwell, and scour the Seven Dials for her.

Ard. And do you think we shall succeed?

T. Kiny. When did Tom King ever fail, when the object was to serve a friend and to promote mirth ? I'll make you happy, my lad! Zounds ! for a quiz, a hoax, a joke, a

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