History of the Middle and Working Classes, with a Popular Exposition of the Economical and Political Principles which Have Influenced the Past and Present Condition of the Industrious Orders: Also an Appendix of Prices, Rates of Wages, Population, Poor-rates, Mortality, Marriages, Crimes, Education, Occupations, and Other Statistical Information, Illustrative of the Former and Present State of the Agricultural, Commercial, and Manufacturing Classes ...

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Effingham Wilson, 1835 - Great Britain - 604 pages

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Page 428 - Society is produced by our wants and government by our wickedness; the former promotes our happiness positively by uniting our affections, the latter negatively by restraining our vices.
Page 20 - For a pair of diamond buckles, perhaps, or for something as frivolous and useless, they exchanged the maintenance, or what is the same thing, the price of the maintenance of a thousand men for a year, and with it the whole weight and authority which it could give them.
Page 231 - The subsistence which they find there is so scanty, that they are eager to fish up the nastiest garbage thrown overboard from any European ship. Any carrion, the carcass of a dead dog or cat, for example, though half putrid and stinking, is as welcome to them as the most wholesome food to the people of other countries.
Page 515 - By the apostle Paul, shadows to-night Have struck more terror to the soul of Richard, Than can the substance of ten thousand soldiers, Armed in proof, and led by shallow Richmond.
Page 121 - I think it will be but a very modest computation to say, that of the products of the earth useful to the life of man nine tenths are the effects of labour...
Page 91 - Let us ... make relief in cases where there are a number of children, a matter of right and an honour, instead of a ground for opprobrium and contempt.
Page 486 - Upon these several accounts we may venture, with a few exceptions, to pronounce, that even the poorest and the worst provided, in countries where property and the consequences of property prevail, are in a better situation, with respect to food, raiment, houses, and what are called the necessaries of life, than any are in places where most things remain in common.
Page 120 - For it is labour indeed that puts the difference of value on everything ; and let any one consider what the difference is between an acre of land planted with tobacco or sugar, sown with wheat or barley, and an acre of the same land lying in common without any husbandry upon it, and he will find that the improvement of labour makes the far greater part of the value.
Page 120 - Nobody ever saw a dog make a fair and deliberate exchange of one bone for another with another dog.
Page 304 - Is not the whole land before thee? separate thyself, I pray thee, from me : if thou wilt take the left hand, then I will go to the right ; or if thou take the right hand, then I will go to the left.

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