Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason

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Psychology Press, 2001 - Civilization - 282 pages
22 Reviews
In this classic account of madness, Michel Foucault shows once and for all why he is one of the most distinguished European philosophers since the end of World War II. Madness and Civilization, Foucault's first book and his finest accomplishment, will change the way in which you think about society. Evoking shock, pity and fascination, it might also make you question the way you think about yourself.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - breadhat - LibraryThing

Four stars, I guess? I don't really know how to review something like this. There were several sections, including the conclusion, that I didn't feel I understood at all. And Foucault continues to ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Brendan.H - LibraryThing

Difficult to review because I wouldn't claim to have a clear understanding of everything that the author is attempting to communicate. It doesn't help that the syntax can be brutal, with quite a bit ... Read full review

Contents

The Great Confinement
35
The Insane
61
Passion and Delirium
80
Aspects of Madness m
111
Doctors and Patients
151
The Great Fear
189
The New Division
210
The Birth of the Asylum
229
CONCLUSION
265
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About the author (2001)

Michel Foucault (1926-1984) Celebrated French thinker and activist who challenged people's assumptions about care of the mentally ill, gay rights, prisons, the police and welfare.

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