Shakespere's Historical Play of King Henry the Eighth: Arranged for Representation at the Princess's Theatre

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Chapman, 1855 - 89 pages
 

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Page 80 - His promises were, as he then was, mighty ; But his performance, as he is now, nothing. Of his own body he was ill, and gave The clergy ill example. Grif. Noble madam, Men's evil manners live in brass ; their virtues We write in water.
Page 69 - But far beyond my depth : my high-blown pride At length broke under me ; and now has left me, Weary, and old with service, to the mercy Of a rude stream that must for ever hide me. Vain pomp, and glory of this world, I hate ye ; I feel my heart new open'd : O, how wretched Is that poor man that hangs on princes...
Page 70 - Crom. Last, that the Lady Anne, Whom the King hath in secrecy long married, This day was view'd in open, as his Queen, Going to chapel ; and the voice is now Only about her coronation. Wol. There was the weight that pull'd me down. O Cromwell, The King has gone beyond me : all my glories In that one woman I have lost for ever.
Page 80 - So went to bed, where eagerly his sickness Pursu'd him still ; and three nights after this, About the hour of eight, which he himself Foretold should be his last, full of repentance, Continual meditations, tears, and sorrows, He gave his honours to the world again, His blessed part to heaven, and slept in peace.
Page 81 - After my death I wish no other herald,. 'No other speaker of my living actions, To keep mine honour from corruption, But such an honest chronicler as Griffith.
Page 89 - Her own shall bless her: Her foes shake like a field of beaten corn, And hang their heads with sorrow: Good grows with her : In her days every man shall eat in safety, Under his own vine, what he plants; and sing The merry songs of peace to all his neighbours...
Page 80 - And though he were unsatisfied in getting, (Which was a sin) yet in bestowing, madam, He was most princely: Ever witness for him Those twins of learning, that he raised in you, Ipswich and Oxford ! One of which fell with him, Unwilling to outlive the good that did it; The other, though unfinished, yet so famous, So excellent in art, and still so rising, That Christendom shall ever speak his virtue.
Page 71 - Cromwell, I did not think to shed a tear In all my miseries ; but thou hast forc'd me, Out of thy honest truth, to play the woman. Let's dry our eyes ; and thus far hear me, Cromwell ; And, when I am forgotten, as I shall be, And sleep in dull cold marble...
Page 71 - Corruption wins not more than honesty. Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace To silence envious tongues. Be just, and fear not...
Page 32 - ... holding in his hand a very fair orange, whereof the meat or substance within was taken out, and filled up again with the part of a sponge, wherein was vinegar, and other confections against the pestilent airs ; the which he most commonly smelt unto, passing among the press, or else when he was pestered with many suitors.

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