The Register of arts, and journal of patent inventions, ed. by L. Herbert, Volume 6

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Luke Hebert
1832
 

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Page 58 - It appears that the water of the Thames, when free from extraneous substances, is in. a state of considerable purity, containing only a moderate quantity of saline contentSi and those of a kind which cannot be supposed to render it unfit for domestic purposes, or to be injurious to the health. But as it approaches the metropolis it becomes loaded with a quantity of filth, which renders it disgusting to the senses, and improper to be employed in the preparation of food.
Page 58 - ... however, a considerable length of time to allow of the complete separation ; while, on account of its peculiar texture and comminuted state, it is disposed to be again diffused through the water, by a slight degree of agitation, while the gradual accumulation of this .matter in the reservoirs, rmist obviously increase the unpleasant odour and flavour of the water, and promote its tendency to the putrid state.
Page 123 - ... yielding a greater proportion of pure oil than that which is recently expressed from the fruit. Two or three gallons skimmed from the surface of a large jar that has remained at rest for twelve months or upwards, is preferable to any succeeding portion from the same jar, and may be considered the cream of the oil. Having procured good oil in the first instance, put about one gallon into a cast-iron vessel capable of holding two gallons ; place it over a slow clear fire, keeping a thermometer...
Page 117 - AMERICAN PATENTS. Specification of a patent for an improvement in the manufacture of rv heels, pinions, or movements to be employed in the construction of Clocks, Time-pieces, or other machinery. Granted to JOHN P. BAKEWELL, Pittsburgh, Alleghany county.
Page 58 - It appears, that the water of the Thames, when free from extraneous substances, is in a state of considerable purity, containing only a moderate quantity of saline contents, and those of a kind which cannot be supposed to render, it unfit for domestic purposes, or to be injurious to the health ; but as it approaches the metropolis, it becomes loaded with a quantity of filth...
Page 300 - Spinner, for certain improvements in certain machinery, by aid of which machinery, machines commonly called Mules are or may be rendered what is termed self-acting; that is to say, certain improvements in certain machinery, by aid of which machinery spinning machines, commonly called Mules, are or may be worked by power, without...
Page 211 - The laminae of copper are turned over the respective mast-heads, and secured about an inch or more down on the opposite side ; the cap which corresponds is prepared in a somewhat similar way, the copper being continued from the lining in the aft part of the round hole, over the cap, into the fore part of the square one, where it is turned down and secured as before, so that when the cap is in its place, the contact is complete. In this way, we have, under all circumstances, a continuous metallic...
Page 192 - Middlesex, civil engineer, for improvements in the apparatus of heating air in buildings, heating and evaporating fluids, and heating metals. — July 30, 1831.— Six months.
Page 58 - same circumstances of the tide ; but the observations are " sufficiently uniform to warrant us in concluding, that the " Water is in the purest state at low tide, and the most " loaded with extraneous matter at half ebb. It would " appear, however, that a very considerable part, if not " the whole, of this extraneous matter may be removed by " filtration through sand, and still more effectually, by a " mixture of sand and charcoal.
Page 210 - ... to the sea — that it be permanently fixed in the masts, throughout their whole extent, so as to admit of the motion of one portion of the mast upon another ; and, in case of the removal of any part of the mast, together with the conductor attached to it, either from accident or design, the remaining portion should still be perfect, and equivalent to transmit an electrical discharge into the sea.

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