Harper's Magazine, Volume 15

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Henry Mills Alden, Lee Foster Hartman, Frederick Lewis Allen, Thomas Bucklin Wells
Harper's Magazine Foundation, 1857 - American literature
Important American periodical dating back to 1850.

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Page 381 - Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed: But thy eternal summer shall not fade...
Page 410 - Behold an emblem: those who do endure Deep wrongs for man, and scorn, and chains, but heap Thousandfold torment on themselves and him.
Page 126 - Who, though so noble, share in the world's toil, And, though so task'd, keep free from dust and soil! I will not say that your mild deeps retain A tinge, it may be, of their silent pain Who have long'd deeply once, and long'd in vain; But I will rather say that you remain A world above man's head...
Page 421 - And Paul said; I would to God, that not only thou, but also all that hear me this day, were both almost, and altogether such as I am, except these bonds.
Page 126 - But I will rather say that you remain A world above man's head, to let him see How boundless might his soul's horizons be, How vast, yet of what clear transparency! How it were good to abide there, and breathe free ; How fair a lot to fill Is left to each man still!
Page 409 - The charges against me are all of one kind, that I have pushed the principles of general justice and benevolence too far ; farther than a cautious policy would warrant, and farther than the opinions of many would go along with me. In every accident which may happen through life — in pain, in sorrow, in depression, and distress — I will call to mind this accusation, and be comforted.
Page 439 - IF thou wouldst view fair Melrose aright, Go visit it by the pale moonlight; For the gay beams of lightsome day Gild, but to flout, the ruins gray.
Page 266 - Every one of my writings has been furnished to me by a thousand different persons, a thousand different things: the learned and the ignorant, the wise and the foolish, infancy and age have come in...
Page 281 - PUT them in mind to be subject to principalities and powers, to obey magistrates, to be ready to every good work, 2 To speak evil of no man, to be no brawlers, but gentle, shewing all meekness unto all men.
Page 407 - Whatever crazy sorrow saith, No life that breathes with human breath Has ever truly long'd for death. ' Tis life, whereof our nerves are scant, Oh life, not death, for which we pant; More life, and fuller, that I want.

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