Literature and Dissent in Milton's England

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 20, 2003 - Literary Criticism - 302 pages
The England of John Milton's great poems was the England of Dissenters, those who refused to join the state church after the return of monarchy in 1660, seen as dangerous outcasts and rebels. Sharon Achinstein's book shows how a literary tradition of dissent was produced by those who suffered political defeat and religious exclusion in Restoration England, bringing to view a range of writing that has been largely, and unjustly, neglected. This important study will be of interest to Milton scholars and seventeenth-century literary and religious historians.

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Contents

Reading Dissent
1
Memory
23
Prison
59
Violence
84
Milton
115
Enthusiasm
154
Poetics
182
Hymn
210
enlightenment
243
Miltons burial place
256
Notes
258
Index
298
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About the author (2003)

Sharon Achinstein is Lecturer in English at Oxford University and a Fellow of St Edmund Hall, and has previously taught at the University of Maryland and Northwestern University. She is the author of Milton and the Revolutionary Reader (1994), which won the Milton Society of America's Hanford Prize, and edited Literature, Gender and the English Revolution (1994).

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