Oliver's Cromwell's letters and speeches with elucidations, Volume 1

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B. Tauchnitz, 1894 - 16 pages
 

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Page 96 - I came into the House one morning, well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking, whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled ; for it was a plain cloth suit, which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor ; his linen was plain, and not very clean; and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar : his hat was without a hatband. His stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side ; his countenance swollen and reddish; his...
Page 214 - They have mouths, but they speak not: eyes have they, but they see not: They have ears, but they hear not: noses have they, but they smell not...
Page 289 - Turn you at my reproof: behold, I will pour out my Spirit unto you, I will make known my words unto you.
Page 96 - Parliament, and by the authority of the same, that the people of England, and of all the dominions and territories thereunto belonging, are and shall be, and are hereby constituted, made, established, and confirmed, to be a Commonwealth and Free State, and shall from henceforth be governed as a Commonwealth and Free State...
Page 206 - And for brethren, in things of the mind we look for no compulsion, but that of light and reason. In other things, God hath put the sword in the Parliament's hands, — for the terror of evil-doers, and the praise of them that do well.
Page 167 - It brake his leg. We were necessitated to have it cut off, whereof he died. " Sir, you know my own trials this way ; but the Lord supported me with this. That the Lord took him into the happiness we all pant for and live for.
Page 87 - Truly, then, this I find: That He giveth springs in a dry barren wilderness where no water is. I live, you know where, — in Meshec, which they say signifies Prolonging; in Kedar, which signifies Blackness: yet the Lord forsaketh me not. Though He do prolong, yet He will I trust bring me to His tabernacle, to His resting-place.
Page 152 - And is it not so, clearly? That which caused your men to storm so courageously, it was the Spirit of God, who gave your men courage, and took it away again; and gave the Enemy courage, and took it away again; and gave your men courage again, and therewith this happy success. And therefore it is good that God alone have all the glory.
Page 44 - Ages ; this is the element which stamps them as Heroic, and has rendered their works great, manlike, fruitful to all generations. It is by far the memorablest achievement of our Species; without that element, in some form or other, nothing of Heroic had ever been among us. For many centuries, Catholic Christianity, a fit embodiment of that divine Sense, had been current more or less, making the generations noble : and here in England, in the Century called the Seventeenth, we see the last aspect...
Page 191 - SIR, Being commanded by you to this service, I think myself bound to acquaint you with the good hand of God towards you and us. We marched yesterday after the King, who went before us from Daventry to Harborough ; and quartered about six miles from him. This day we marched towards him. He drew out to meet us ; both Armies engaged. We, after three hours...

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