The Collected Writings of Thomas De Quincey, Volume 2

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Page 256 - Or mild concerns of ordinary life, A constant influence, a peculiar grace ; But who, if he be called upon to face Some awful moment to which Heaven has joined Great issues, good or bad for human kind, Is happy as a Lover ; and attired With sudden brightness, like a Man inspired...
Page 208 - But how can He expect that others should Build for him, sow for him, and at his call Love him, who for himself will take no heed at all...
Page 262 - All shod with steel, We hissed along the polished ice in games Confederate, imitative of the chase And woodland pleasures, - the resounding horn, The pack loud chiming, and the hunted hare.
Page 234 - One window there was — a perfect and unpretending cottage window, with little diamond panes, embowered at almost every season of the year with roses, and in the summer and autumn with a profusion of jasmine and other fragrant shrubs.
Page 148 - I recognized my object. This was Coleridge. I examined him steadfastly for a minute or more ; and it struck me that he saw neither myself nor any other object in the street.
Page 446 - When Mrs. Siddons came into the room, there happened to be no chair ready for her, which he observing, said with a smile, ' Madam, you who so often occasion a want of seats to other people, will the more easily excuse the want of one yourself.
Page 137 - ... greatest event in the unfolding of my own mind. Let me say in one word, that, at a period when neither the one nor the other writer was valued by the public — both having a long warfare to accomplish of contumely and ridicule, before they could rise into their present estimation — I found in these poems " the ray of a new morning," and an absolute revelation of untrodden worlds, teeming with power and beauty, as yet unsuspected amongst men.
Page 135 - I mourned with thousands, but as one More deeply grieved, for He was gone Whose light I hailed when first it shone. And showed my youth How Yerse may build a princely throne On humble truth.
Page 235 - She was a Phantom of delight When first she gleamed upon my sight; A lovely Apparition, sent To be a moment's ornament; Her eyes as stars of Twilight fair; Like Twilight's, too, her dusky hair; But all things else about her drawn From May-time and the cheerful Dawn; A dancing Shape, an Image gay, To haunt, to startle, and waylay.
Page 282 - When she I loved was strong and gay, And like a rose in June, I to her cottage bent my way, Beneath the evening Moon. Upon the Moon I fixed my eye, All over the wide lea : My Horse trudged on — and we drew nigh Those paths so dear to me. And now we reached the orchard plot ; And, as we climbed the hill, Towards the roof of Lucy's cot The Moon descended still.

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