The Lives of the Lord Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal of Ireland: From the Earliest Times to the Reign of Queen Victoria, Volume 2

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1870 - Judges
 

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Page 452 - She sings the wild song of her dear native plains, Every note which he loved awaking — Ah '. little they think, who delight in her strains, How the heart of the minstrel is breaking...
Page 217 - No matter in what language his doom may have been pronounced, — no matter what complexion, incompatible with Freedom, an Indian or an African sun may have burnt upon him, — no matter in what disastrous battle his liberty may have been cloven down, — no matter with what solemnities he may have been devoted upon the altar of Slavery : the first moment he touches the sacred soil of Britain, the altar and the god sink together...
Page 333 - The steps of a good man are ordered by the Lord: and he delighteth in his way. Though he fall, he shall not be utterly cast down : for the Lord upholdeth him with his hand.
Page 409 - I am amazed at his Grace's speech. The noble duke cannot look before him, behind him, or on either side of him, without seeing some noble peer, who owes his seat in this house to his successful exertions in the profession to which I belong.
Page 442 - I will resist it to the last gasp of my existence and with the last drop of my blood, and when I feel the hour of my dissolution approaching, I will, like the father of Hannibal, take my children to the altar and swear them to eternal hostility against the invaders of their country's freedom.
Page 462 - I am going to my cold and silent grave : my lamp of life is nearly extinguished : my race is run : the grave opens to receive me, and I sink into its bosom. I have but one request to ask at my departure from this world ; it is the charity of its silence. Let no man write my epitaph ; for as no man who knows...
Page 463 - Yes, weep, and however my foes may condemn, Thy tears shall efface their decree ; For, Heaven can witness, though guilty to them, I have been but too faithful to thee ! With thee were the dreams of my earliest love ; Every thought of my reason was thine...
Page 328 - Alas! they had been friends in youth; But whispering tongues can poison truth; And constancy lives in realms above; And life is thorny; and youth is vain; And to be wroth with one we love Doth work like madness in the brain.
Page 464 - But the night-dew that falls, though in silence it weeps, Shall brighten with verdure the grave where he sleeps; And the tear that we shed, though in secret it rolls, Shall long keep his memory green in our souls.
Page 443 - I in the most express terms deny the competency of parliament to do this act — I warn you, do not dare to lay your hand on the Constitution. I tell you that if, circumstanced as you are, you pass this act, it will be a nullity, and that no man in Ireland will be bound to obey it.

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