Berlin under the New Empire, Volume 2

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 5, 2013 - History - 504 pages
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In the wake of German unification in 1871, Berlin became a place of increased interest to the other nations of Europe. The journalist Henry Vizetelly (1820-94) made his first journey to the capital of the new empire in 1872. Based on observations from a series of visits, this two-volume work presents a witty and detailed portrait of the city and its inhabitants. The topics covered in Volume 2 include the Prussian Landtag, the Reichstag, Berlin's places of education, its palaces, churches and museums, and its restaurants, cafés and beer gardens. Chapters on theatre, music, satire and socialism give a vivid sense of the cultural and political zeitgeist. Illustrated with hundreds of engravings from designs by German artists, the work first appeared in 1879. Vizetelly's Paris in Peril (1882) and Glances Back through Seventy Years (1893) are also reissued in this series.
 

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Contents

THEREICHSTAG
18
III
43
IV
66
BERLINUNIVERSITY
83
O O O O O O O O O O I O O O O O O 0
108
IX
172
THEFINANCIALCRASH
193
THE COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY OF BERLIN
223
XVI
297
XVII
309
XVIII
334
XIX
351
XX
366
XXI
376
XXII
383
AT BERLIN
408

XIII
235
XIV
269
XV
282
XXIV
425
APPENDIX
463
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Fitz Hugh Ludlow (1836-1870) was an American author, journalist, and explorer; best known for his autobiographical book "The Hasheesh Eater" (1857).

Henry Richard Vizetelly (1820-1894) was an English publisher and writer. He started the publications "Pictorial Times" and "Illustrated Times", wrote several books while working in Paris and Berlin as correspondent for the Illustrated London News, and in 1887 founded a publishing house in London, Vizetelly and Company.

James Russell Lowell (1819-1891) was an American Romantic poet, critic, editor, and diplomat. He is associated with the Fireside Poets, a group of New England writers who were among the first American poets who rivaled the popularity of British poets.

Joseph Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He wrote tales and poems of British soldiers in India and stories for children. He was born in Bombay, in the Bombay Presidency of British India, and was taken by his family to England when he was five years old. In 1907, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the first English-language writer to receive the prize, and its youngest recipient to date. Among other honours, he was sounded out for the British Poet Laureateship and on several occasions for a knighthood, all of which he declined.

Charles Pierre Baudelaire (1821-1867) was a French poet who also produced notable work as an essayist, art critic, and pioneering translator of Edgar Allan Poe.

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