Musical Communication

Front Cover
Music is a powerful means of communication. It provides a means by which people can share emotions, intentions, and meanings even though their spoken languages may be mutually incomprehensible. It can also provide a vital lifeline to human interaction for those whose special needs make other means of communication difficult. Music can exert powerful physical effects, can produce deep and profound emotions within us, and can be used to generate infinitely subtle variations of expressiveness by skilled composers and performers.
This new addition to the music psychology list brings together leading researchers from a variety of academic and applied backgrounds. It examines how music can be used to communicate and the biological, cognitive, social, and cultural processes which underlie such communication. Taking a broad, interdisciplinary look at all aspects of communication, from the symbolic aspects of musical notation, to the use of music in advertising, the book is the first of its kind. It will be valuable for all those involved in music cognition, music education, and communication studies.
 

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Contents

Music and meaning ambiguity and evolution
27
Music and conversation
45
defining constraints on musical
61
expression perception and induction
85
invented
117
How the conventions of music notation shape musical perception
143
Rhythm human temporality and brain function
171
Musical companionship musical community Music therapy
193
Musical communication and childrens communities
261
Musical communication between adults and young children
281
Pedagogical communication in the music classroom
301
a vehicle for identity development
321
an exploration of musics ability
339
Communication in Indian raga performance
361
The role of music communication in cinema
383
Musical communication in commercial contexts
405

Bodily communication in musical performance
215
Singing as communication
239

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About the author (2005)

Dorothy Miell is at Professor of Psychology, The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK. Raymond MacDonald is at Reader in Psychology, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK.

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