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6. Forms.

libel are contained dirers other false, seditious, scandalous, and malicios matters, according to the tenor following, to arit, — ; to the evil example of all others, and against the peace of our said lady the Queen, her erora and dignity.

(5). Indictment far seditious words.

- The jurors for our lord the King upon their oath present, that J. &. late of the parish of B., in the county of M., being a wicked, malicious, sediti. ous, and ill-disposed person, and wickedly, maliciously, and seditiously contriing and intending the peace of our said lord the King and this kingdom of Eng. land to disquiet and disturb, and the liege subjects of our said lord the King to incite and move to the hatred and dislike of the person of our said lord the King; and to scandalize and vilify the colonels and other officers of the quando of our said lord the King, on the day of — , in the year of the reign of our sovereign lord the King, with force and arms, at the perisa aforesaid, in the county aforesaid, in the presence and hearing of dirers liege subjects of our said lord the King, wickedly, maliciously, and seditiously did publish, utter, pronounce, and declare with a loud voice, of and concerning our said lord the King, and of and concerning the colonels and other officers of the guards of our said lord the King, these English words following, that is to say: The colonels and the rest of the officers (meaning the colonels and of cers of the guards of our said lord the King) are a company of rogues sed millains; for their business is to uphold their master (meaning our said lord tåe King), who (meaning our said lord the King) is a villain and a rogue, and exer kept his word in any thing he said :" to the great scandal of our said lend the King, and of the colonels and other officers of the guards of our said lord the King, in contempt of our said lord the King, in open violation of the lens op this kingdom, to the evil and pernicious example of all others, and against the peace of our said lord the King, his crown and dignity.

See forms as to obscene libels, ante, tit. " Lewdness."

Obscene libels.

(6). Commitment for a libel on an individual.

Commencement as usual, ante, 54, (No. 1).]-on the day of —, D. - , at the parish of , in the said county, unlawfully, wickedly, cad ms. liciously did compose and publish a certain false, scandalous, malicious, and defamatory libel, containing divers false, scandalous, and malicious matters sul things of and concerning A. B. And you, the said keeper, &c. (Conclede as usual].

(7). Indictment for writing and sending a libellous letter to prosecutor.

- The jurors for our lady the Queen upon their oath present, that J.F.. late of the parish of — , in the county of labourer], wickedly, makeously, and unlawfully, contriving and intending to injure and defame T. P., ani to bring him into contempt, hatred, infamy, and disgrace, and to proroke al incite him to break the peace of our lady the Queen, on the day of the year of the reign of our lady the now Queen Victoria, with force el arms, to wit, at C., in the county of M., did compose and publish a certain faia scandalous, malicious, defamatory, and libellous writing of and concerning thr said T. P., [in the form of a letter addressed and directed to the said T. P.1, and which said writing then and there contained the following false, seadelou malicious, defamatory, and libellous matter of and concerning the said T. P. that is to say, Sir, (meaning the said T. P.), knowing you, gre. [bere set out the whole letter with innuendoes. Great care must be observed that the letter be correctly set forth]. And the jurors aforesaid, upon their oath aforesaid, & further present that the said J. F. contriving and intending as aforesaid, after wards, to wit, on the said day of — , in the year of the reign aforesaid, at N. aforesaid, in the county aforesaid, unlawfully, trickediy, caul maliciously did send, and cause to be sent, to the said T. P., and did tereta then and there unlawfully, wickedly, and maliciously publish, and cause to de published, the said false, scandalous, malicious, defamatory, and libellons bil. ing, to the great damage, scandal, infamy, and disgrace of the said T. P., is the evil and pernicious example of all others, in contempt of our said lady the Queen and her laws, and against the peace of our said lady the Queen, her cro and dignity.

And the jurors aforesaid, on their oath aforesaid, do further present, that the said J. F. further contriving and intending as aforesaid, on the said day

Secoad count, for publishing part of letter, generally.

6. Forms.

of - in the year, 8c., with force and arms, at N. &c. aforesaid, of his great hatred, malice, and ill will towards the said T. P., unlawfully, wickedly, and maliciously did publish, and cause to be published, a certain other false, scandalous, malicious, and defamatory libel of and concerning the said T. P., containing therein, amongst other things, the false, scandalous, malicious, defa. matory, and libellous matter following, of and concerning the said T. P., that is to say, &c. [here set out the libellous part of the libel]; thereby then and there meaning that (here insert an innuendo of the meaning of the letter, if necessary), to the great damage, scandal, infamy, and disgrace of the said T. P., to the evil example of all others, and against the peace of our said lady the Queen, her crown and dignity.

And the jurors aforesaid, on their oath aforesaid, do further present, that the (81. Count for a

libel by a picture. said C. D., again unlawfully, wickedly, and maliciously devising and intending to injure, defame, and vilify the said A. B., heretofore, to wit, on the day of , in the year of the reign aforesaid, with force and arms, at the parish of in the county aforesaid, unlawfully, wickedly, and maliciously did publish, and cause and procure to be published, a certain scandalous and libel. lous picture of and concerning the said A. B., with divers figures and images therein, and, amongst others, certain figures and images denoting and represent. ing, and intending to denote and represent, [the devil pursuing the said A. B. towards a gallows, and towards a certain fire intended to represent hell], and the said picture being then and there intended to represent that [the said A. B. had been and was guilty of misconduct and crime, deserving punishment by hanging on a gallows, and of punishment after death]; and that the said C. D. the said scandalous and libellous picture, afterwards, to wit, on the said day of — , in the year aforesaid, and on divers other days and times, as well before as afterwards, with force and arms, at &c. aforesaid, to divers liege subjects of our said lady the Queen then and there present, unlawfully, wickedly, and maliciously, did openly shew and exhibit, and cause to be shewn and exhibited, to the great scandal and disgrace of the said A. B., to the evil example of all others, and against the peace of our said lady the Queen, her crown and dignity.

See a form of Indictment for a libel for hanging a man in effigy. (Jery. Arch. C. L. 9th ed. 627.)

Lien, of Innkeepers, see ante, Vol. I. p. 120. Of Clerk of Assize

on Record, see R. v. Bury, (1 Leach, 201), and tit. Clerk of the Peace," Vol. I. p. 689.

Lighting and cUatching of Parishes. See Watching and

Lighting,Vol. VI.

Limitation of Prosecutions, &c. THERE is, in general, no limitation of proceedings for offences ; (see ante, 859); but, by various statutes imposing pecuniary and other penalties, a time is given, within which such penalties must be proceeded for. See the various titles throughout this work. And sometimes general acts of pardon and indemnity are passed, which operate like a liinitation; see the 20 Geo. II. c. 52.

As to the limitation of penal actions in general, see ante, 916.

As to the limitation of actions against justices, &c., see ante, 1039, and tit. “ Constable,Vol. I.

As to the calculation of time, see tit. Time," Vol. VI.

Duties.

Embezzlement.

servants.

p. 1146.

to be affixed to any foreign linens imported, in imitation of the I

Linen Cloth.
For the duties on linen cloth printed or stained, see tit. “ Esitu"
Vol. II

As to journeymen and other workmen embezzling the materias e the linen manufacture, see ante, tit. “ Larceny;past

, tit. “ Serretan Vol. V. Disputes with

As to disputes between masters and servants in the linen partie

tures, see tit. “ Servants," Vol. V. Destroying. As to the offence of maliciously injuring linen, &c., in the course of

manufacture, see the 7 & 8 Geo. IV. c. 30, s. 3, 27, and tit.“ Viiman

Injuries to Property,Vol. V. p. 28, 30. Stealing.

As to stealing linen in process of manufacture, see ante, tit. “ Larsa, Who may set up By stat. 15 Car. II. c. 15, s. 2, any person, native or foreima, ni itades to the linen without

paying anything, in any place, privileged or unpriviles.com porate or not corporate, set up and exercise the occupation of treating hickling, or dressing of hemp or flax ; as also of making or white of thread; as also of spinning, weaving, making, whitening

, is lie ing any cloth made of hemp or flax only; as also the mystery of stan twine or nets for fishery, or of stoving of cordage; as also tibe uzar el

making tapestry hangings. Foreigners. Sect. 3. And all foreigners that shall use any of the trends eins

three years shall (taking the oaths of allegiance and super seksi two justices near unto their dwellings) enjoy all privilege akarna

born subjects. Deceitful making

By stat. 1 Eliz. c. 12, s. 1, whereas certain evil-dispred yena! sundry devices, stretch linen cloth both in length and bread., 1.20 with battledores, or otherwise, beat the same, casting therente, deceitful liquors mingled with chalk, and other like thing with the cloth is made finer and thicker to the eye, but the time thereby loosened and made weak; if any person shall hereafter 22 said deceits, or do any other act with any linen cloth, whereti i sa be made worse, the said cloth shall be forfeited, and the same punished by one month's imprisonment at the least, and pay ed a

as the justices shall assess. What justices may

Sect. 2. And the judges of assize, and justices of the peat, aime determine offences of them, (one being of the quorum), may hear and determine in

in their sessions, by information, indictment, or upon the triki

any presentment or indictment found before them, How informer Sect. 3. If any person shall seize any such deceitful linen shall pursue his shall, at the next sessions, or before two justices, (one being atm.

rum), make due information of the offence and of the seinun shall procure the offender to be indicted at the next sessions

, ISO also be bound by recognizance or obligation to pursue the effect, and to give evidence, and to pay the moiety of what ** recover to the sheriff or other accountant to the use of the best on

the other half shall go to the informer or prosecutor. Certificate of Sect. 4. The justices, before whom the offence shall be tra

certify the same by estreat into the Exchequer yearly, at Hibero chequer.

as they do other estreats; and thereupon the barons may use cess for so much thereof as appertaineth to the King, in live

for other fines. Affixing counter By stat. 17 Geo. II. c. 30, s. 1, If any person shall cause sys?

ot linen cloth.

suit.

estreat into Ex.

feit stamps on linen cloth.

ut on Scotch or Irish linens, he shall forfeit 61. for each piece; or Linen cloth. iany person shall sell, expose to sale, or pack up for sale, any foreign,

17 Geo. 2, c. 30. nens, (knowing them to be so stamped), as the manufacture of Scotand or Ireland, he shall forfeit the same, and also 51. for each piece. ind if any person shall affix any counterfeit stamp on any linen of the nanufacture of Great Britain or Ireland, in order to vend the same as inens duly stamped, he shall forfeit 51, for each piece ; and if any verson shall sell, expose to sale, or pack up for sale, any such linens, nowing them to be so stamped, he shall forfeit the same, and also 51. or each piece.

Sect. 2. And one justice may convict the offender on the oath of one vitness, and may grant his warrant for distress and sale, rendering the verplus, if any there be ; and for want of sufficient distress, any ustice, on proof thereof made on oath by the person executing the warrant, may commit him to gaol for six months, unless it be paid rooner; which penalty and forfeiture shall go to the informer, deductng 2s. in the pound to be paid to the constable who shall execute the warrant.

[The stat. 4 Geo. IV. c. 40, s. 1, repeals so much of the stat. 17 Geo. II. c. 30, as relates to the sealing, measuring, stamping, marking, or lapping, of the several kinds of linen cloth, previous to exportation or sale.]

Sect. 3. enacts, That every manufacturer or weaver of linen, and every trader and dealer in linen manufacture in Scotland, may weave his name or fix any such mark or seal as he shall think fit, in or to any piece of linen cloth manufactured by him, for the purpose of denoting the length and breadth or quality thereof. And that if any person shall counterfeit such mark or name, such person shall, on conviction before two or more justices of the peace or magistrates within any burgh, forfeit 1001. for the use of the person whose mark shall be so counterfeited, to be levied and paid as is directed by the stat. 13 Geo. I. c. 26, (An Act for Regulation of Linen Manufactures in Scotland), with respect to the penalty for counterfeiting any mark or name under that act.

As to the Irish linen trade, see the 5 & 6 Will. IV. c. 27.

Literary Property. See Copyright, Vol. I.

Literary Societies, exempted from Rates, &c., by 6 & 7 Vict. c.

36. See Scientific Societies," Vol. V.

Loan Societies. See, ante, Friendly Societies.

Locks, on Canals, foc., Destroying of, see Malicious Injuries to

Property,Vol. V. pp. 33, 34. .

Lodgers, Larceny by, see Larceny," ante, p. 1120.

Log Book, Evidence by, see Evidence,Vol. II. p. 387.

1:

London. THER

ERE are many acts of Parliament relating to the city of Lola and other places within the bills of mortality, which, being caly like are not within the compass of this work, and which would require : distinct volume of themselves. Sir John Fielding, in his “ Extracted to Penal Laws, relating to the Peace and good Order of the City of Lor: don," hath collected these partly amongst other more general loss, the instruction of ignorant offenders, and admonition of the ansari, would be a work of further service to the metropolis, if one per would complete a collection and digest of all the laws relating i cities of London and Westminster, and other places within the bike mortality; out of which might be selected again such only as comme the office of a justice of the peace in particular.

As to the delivery of parcels, &c., and the porterage act, skie

By stat. 51 Geo. III. c. 119, several provisions were enacter', repas ing the 42 Geo. III. c. 76, and the act continuing it

, and print the more effectual administration of the office of a justice in the je? of Middlesex and Surrey.

The building act is the 7 & 8 Vict. c. 84, which repeals the great part of the 14 Geo. III. c. 78, and so much of the 3 & 4 Vict. c. gulating chimnies and chimney-sweepers as relates to the fieturtas and regulation of chimnies and flues within the limits of the scene

Stat. 52 Geo. III. C. 44, relates to the erection of a house within London and Middlesex.

The 57 Geo. III. c. 29, relates to the paving of the sono le Bouderie v. Mills, (1 B. & Adolph. 38), it was held, that the poss the commissioners under this act to remove objects afired a without making compensation, is limited to such things as pr **** the public ways. The 135th sect. of that act prevents the same into superior Courts of “any rate, proceeding, conviction, onder at or thing.". It was held, that a case granted by the justices it is. for the opinion of the Court upon the affirmance of a convictie the act, was a thing within the meaning of the act, and comes removed by certiorari. (R. v. Middleser, 8 D. & R. 117; 4 D. È A C. 41, s.c.)

The 5 Geo. IV. c. c, 6 Geo. IV. c. xxxviii, 9 Geo. IV. clire? Will. IV. c. lvi, relate to the paving and regulating the Regezti and other places, &c. The 7 Geo. IV. c. cxlii, and 10 Geo. IV. c.

lix, relate to the rise the metropolis.

The 3 & 4 Vict. c. xciv, regulates the police in, and see tit. ***
Vol. V.

As to baking in, see tit. Bread,Vol. I.
As to coals, see tit. “ Coals," Vol. I.

riers," Vol. I. p. 525.
As to the regulations of watermen, see tit. “ Thames," Fad

. As to the Central Criminal Court, see tit. “ Central Crisis'. Vol. I.

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