Actresses as Working Women: Their Social Identity in Victorian Culture

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Routledge, Mar 11, 2002 - Performing Arts - 228 pages
Using historical evidence as well as personal accounts, Tracy C. Davis examines the reality of conditions for `ordinary' actresses, their working environments, employment patterns and the reasons why acting continued to be such a popular, though insecure, profession. Firmly grounded in Marxist and feminist theory she looks at representations of women on stage, and the meanings associated with and generated by them.

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