Theology and Slavery: Charles Hodge and Horace Bushnell

Front Cover
Mercer University Press, 2006 - Religion - 230 pages
This book examines two important American Protestant theologians: the archconservative Charles Hodge (1797?1878), and the archliberal Horace Bushnell (1802?1876), and their stances on racial slavery. Hodge, with his rigid doctrine of biblical inerrancy, and Bushnell, with his open-ended experiential theology, represent two poles of thought that continually assert themselves when American Protestants speak out on social issues. This book provides a case study in the moral implications of each of these enduring polarities and upsets conventional understandings of the relationship of conservative and liberal Protestantism to slavery and race. The ambivalent attitudes of both men toward slavery and race are significant aspects of both of their enduring intellectual legacies. This is the first book-length comparison of these two theologians on this subject.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Slavery and Race in the United States
17
Charles Hodge Slavery and Race
55
Horace Bushnell Slavery and Race
115
Hodge Bushnell and Their Legacies
173
Lessons for the Future
186
Works Cited
191
Index
221
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 23 - Edmund S. Morgan, American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia (New York: WW Norton & Company, 1975); Orlando Patterson, Slavery and Social Death: A Comparative Study (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1982). 21. Joan W. Scott, "The Evidence of Experience," Critical Inquiry 17 (Summer 1991): 776.
Page 27 - H. Richard Niebuhr, The Kingdom of God in America (New York: Harper & Row...
Page 3 - Sydney E. Ahlstrom, A Religious History of the American People (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1972); a more compact account is by Winthrop S.
Page 27 - Missions (1810), the American Bible Society (1816), the American Sunday School Union (1824), the American Tract Society (1825), and the American Home Missionary Society (1826).

Bibliographic information