Spectacular Shakespeare: Critical Theory and Popular Cinema

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Courtney Lehmann, Lisa S. Starks
Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 2002 - Performing Arts - 243 pages
Spectacular Shakespeare includes an introduction, nine essays, and an afterword that all address the spectacle of Shakespeare in recent Hollywood films. The essays approach the Shakespeare-as-star phenomenon from various perspectives, some applauding the popularization of the Bard, others critically questioning the appropriation of Shakespeare in contemporary mass culture.

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Sorta helped with my reading project. Thanks?

Contents

Acknowledgments
7
Are We in Love with Shakespeare?
9
Black Monsters and White Masks on the American Screen
25
our own dear queen Ian McKellens Richard III
47
of Baz Luhrmanns William Shakespeares Romeo + Juliet
62
The Erotic Politics of Trevor Nunns Twelfth Night
89
Kenneth Branaghs Much Ado about Nothing
110
Romancing the Author Mastering the Body
125
The Cultural Politics of Kenneth Branaghs Hamlet
149
Hollywood Teaches Hamlet
172
Using Film in the Shakespearean Classroom
187
Teen Things I Hate about Girlene Shakesploitation Flicks in the Late 1990s or NotSoFast Times at Shakespeare High
205
Notes on Contributors
233
Index
237
Copyright

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Page 25 - It is the cause, it is the cause, my soul — Let me not name it to you, you chaste stars ! — It is the cause. Yet I'll not shed her blood; Nor scar that whiter skin of hers than snow, And smooth as monumental alabaster.
Page 83 - Romeo : and when he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine, That all the world shall be in love with night, And pay no worship to the garish sun.
Page 133 - My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep; the more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite.
Page 183 - And there we hope, to your diuers capacities, you will finde enough, both to draw, and hold you: for his wit can no more lie hid, then it could be lost. Reade him, therefore; and againe, and againe: And if then you doe not like him, surely you are in some manifest danger, not to vnderstand him.
Page 183 - And there we hope, to your divers capacities, you will finde enough both to draw and hold you : for his wit can no more lie hid then it could be lost. Reade him, therefore; and againe and againe; and if then you doe not like him, surely you are in some manifest danger not to understand him.
Page 176 - I am too much i' the sun. Queen. Good Hamlet, cast thy nighted colour off, And let thine eye look like a friend on Denmark. Do not for ever with thy vailed lids Seek for thy noble father in the dust : Thou know'st 'tis common ; all that lives must die, Passing through nature to eternity.
Page 216 - I hate the way you talk to me And the way you cut your hair, I hate the way you drive my car, I hate it when you stare. I hate your big dumb combat boots And the way you read my mind. I hate you so much it makes me sick, It even makes me rhyme. I hate the way you're always right, I hate it when you lie. I hate it when you make me laugh, Even worse when you make me cry.
Page 55 - And let my griefs frown on the upper hand. If sorrow can admit society, [Sitting down with them. Tell o'er your woes again by viewing mine : — I had an Edward, till a Richard killed him...
Page 112 - I take to define it, of a sort that leads to acknowledgment; to the reconciliation of a genuine forgiveness; a reconciliation so profound as to require the metamorphosis of death and revival, the achievement of a new perspective on existence; a perspective that presents itself as a place, one removed from the city of confusion and divorce.

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