The Young Gentleman and Lady's Monitor, and English Teacher's Assistant: Being a Collection of Select Pieces from Our Best Modern Writers; Calculated to Eradicate Vulgar Prejudices and Rusticity of Manners; Improve the Understanding [and] Rectify the Will ... Divided Into Small Portions for the Use of Reading in Classes

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D.D. Smith, 1824 - Readers - 323 pages
 

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Page 287 - Thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable ! who sitt'st above these heavens, To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lowest works ; yet these declare Thy goodness beyond thought, and power divine. Speak, ye who best can tell, ye sons of light, Angels ; for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies, day without night, Circle his throne rejoicing : ye in heaven; On earth join all ye creatures to extol Him first, him last, him midst, and without end.
Page 300 - You have done that you should be sorry for. There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats, For I am arm'd so strong in honesty That they pass by me as the idle wind, Which I respect not.
Page 11 - And GOD said unto him, Because thou hast asked this thing, and hast not asked for thyself long life, neither hast asked riches for thyself, nor hast asked the life of thine enemies, but hast asked for thyself understanding to discern judgment: Behold, I have done according to thy words : lo, I have given thee a wise and an understanding heart, so that there was none like thee before thee, neither after thee shall any arise like unto thee.
Page 294 - But that the dread of something after death, — That undiscover'd country, from whose bourn No traveller returns, — puzzles the will ; And makes us rather bear those ills we have, Than fly to others, that we know not of?
Page 286 - Muse, that, on the secret top Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire That shepherd who first taught the chosen seed In the beginning how the heavens and earth Rose out of Chaos : or, if Sion hill Delight thee more, and Siloa's brook that flowed Fast by the oracle of God, I thence Invoke thy aid to my adventrous song, That with no middle flight intends to soar Above the Aonian mount, while it pursues Things unattempted yet in prose or rhyme.
Page 294 - The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds.
Page 289 - And darkness and doubt are now flying away ; No longer I roam in conjecture forlorn : So breaks on the traveller, faint and astray, The bright and the balmy effulgence of morn. See truth, love, and mercy, in triumph descending, And nature all glowing in Eden's first bloom ! On the cold cheek of death smiles and roses are blending, And beauty immortal awakes from the tomb.
Page 287 - Of Nature's womb, that in quaternion run Perpetual circle, multiform ; and mix And nourish all things ; let your ceaseless change Vary to our Great Maker still new praise.
Page 294 - Here will I hold. If there's a power above us (And that there is, all Nature cries aloud Through all her works), he must delight in virtue ; And that which he delights in must be happy.
Page 294 - tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: aye, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come, When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause: there's the respect That makes calamity of so long life ; For who would bear the whips and scorns of time.

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