Travels in the interior districts of Africa. With an account of a subsequent mission to that country in 1805

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Page 9 - It would appear strange to a European to see a child suck a piece of rocksalt as if it were sugar. This, however, I have frequently seen ; although, in the inland parts, the poorer class of inhabitants are so very rarely indulged with this precious article, that to say a man eats salt with his victuals is the same as saying he is a rich man.
Page 4 - Almighty to the superintendance and direction of subordinate spirits, over whom they suppose that certain magical ceremonies have great influence. A white fowl, suspended to the branch of a particular tree; a snake's head, or a few handfuls of fruit, are offerings which ignorance and superstition frequently present, to deprecate the wrath, or to conciliate the favour, of these tutelary agents.
Page 54 - ... dipping it in your own ; but this would not build up my towns, nor bring to life the thousands who fell in the woods. I will not, therefore, kill you in cold blood, but I will retain you as my slave, until I perceive that your presence in your own kingdom will be no longer dangerous to your neighbours ; and then I will consider of the proper way of disposing of you.
Page 53 - Damel coolly told the ambassador that he had no choice to make ; he neither chose to have his head shaved nor his throat cut ; and with this answer the ambassador was civilly dismissed. Abdulkader...
Page 46 - As entreaties and threats were used in vain, the whip was at length applied: and after bearing patiently a few strokes, she started up, and walked with tolerable expedition for four or five hours longer, when she made an attempt to run away from the coffle, but was so very weak, that she fell down in the grass. Though she was unable to rise, the whip was a second time applied, but without effect...
Page 4 - It is remarkable, however, that, except on the appearance of a new moon, as before related, the Pagan natives do not think it necessary to offer up prayers and supplications to the Almighty. They represent the Deity, indeed, as the creator and preserver of all things ; but in general they consider him as a Being so remote, and of so exalted a nature, that it is idle to imagine the feeble supplications of wretched mortals can reverse the decrees, and change the purposes of unerring Wisdom.
Page 11 - The furnace was a circular tower of clay, about ten feet high and three feet in diameter, surrounded in two places with withes, to prevent the clay from cracking and falling to pieces by the violence of the heat. Round the lower part, on a level with the ground (but not so low as the bottom of the furnace, which was somewhat concave), were made seven openings, into...
Page 53 - Damel, instead of setting his foot upon his neck, and stabbing him with his spear, according to custom in such cases, addressed him as follows : — 'Abdulkader, answer me this question. If the chance of war had placed me in your situation and you in mine, how would you have treated me ?' 'I would have thrust my spear into your heart/ returned Abdulkader, with great firmness, 'and I know that a similar fate awaits me.
Page 53 - I would have thrust my spear into your heart/ returned Abdulkader, with great firmness, 'and I know that a similar fate awaits me.' 'Not so/ said Damel, ' my spear is indeed red with the blood of your subjects killed in battle, and I could now give it a deeper stain by dipping it in your own; but this would not build up my towns, nor bring to life the thousands who fell in the woods. I will not, therefore, kill you in cold blood, but I will retain you as my slave, until I perceive...
Page 38 - Such of them as evince marks of discontent, are secured in a different manner. A thick billet of wood is cut about three feet long, and a smooth notch being made upon one side of it, the ankle of the slave is bolted to the smooth part by means of a strong iron staple, one prong of which passes on each side of the ankle.

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