The Gentlemen's Book of Etiquette, and Manual of Politeness: Being a Complete Guide for a Gentleman's Conduct in All His Relations Towards Society...From the Best French, English, and American Authorities

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J.S. Locke, 1874 - Etiquette - 332 pages
 

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Contents

I
11
II
31
IV
50
V
66
VI
75
VII
91
IX
116
X
154
XII
183
XIII
186
XIV
222
XV
228
XVI
244
XVII
252
XVIII
280
XIX
294

XI
176
XX
298

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Page 326 - Beware Of entrance to a quarrel, but being in, Bear 't that the opposed may beware of thee. Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice ; Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not express'd in fancy ; rich, not gaudy ; For the apparel oft proclaims the man, And they in France of the best rank and station Are most select and generous, chief in that.
Page 45 - Is not the whole land before thee? separate thyself, I pray thee, from me : if thou wilt take the left hand, then I will go to the right ; or if thou depart to the right hand, then I will go to the left.
Page 47 - For the king knoweth of these things before whom also I speak freely; for I am persuaded that none of these things are hidden from him; for this thing was not done in a corner.
Page 187 - Talent is something, but tact is everything. Talent is serious, sober, grave, and respectable ; tact is all that and more too. It is not a sixth sense, but it is the life of all the five. It is the open eye, the quick ear, the judging taste, the keen smell, and the lively touch ; it is the interpreter of all riddles — the surmounter of all difficulties — the remover of all obstacles.
Page 49 - The man that hails you Tom or Jack, And proves by thumps upon your back How he esteems your merit, Is such a friend, that one had need Be very much his friend indeed, To pardon or to bear it.
Page 48 - And Paul said, I would to God, that not only thou, but also all that hear me this day, were both almost, and altogether such as I am, except these bonds.
Page 326 - Neither a borrower, nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. This above all: to thine own self be true, And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man.
Page 307 - You should not only have attention to everything, but a quickness of attention, so as to observe, at once, all the people in the room, their motions, their looks, and their words, and yet without staring at them, and seeming to be an observer. This quick and unobserved observation is of infinite advantage in life, and is to be acquired with care ; and, on the contrary, what is called absence, which is...
Page 91 - Dancing is in itself a very trifling, silly thing ; but it is one of those established follies to which people of sense are sometimes obliged to conform, and then they should be able to do it well. And though I would not have you a dancer, yet when you do dance I would have you dance well, as I would have you do everything you do well.
Page 259 - Style is the dress of thoughts ; and let them be ever so just, if your style is homely, coarse, and vulgar, they will appear to as much disadvantage, and be as ill received as your person, though ever so well proportioned, would, if dressed in rags, dirt, and tatters.

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