Anecdotes of Some Distingushed Persons: Chiefly of the Present and Two Preceding Centuries, Volume 2

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T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1796 - Anecdotes
 

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Page 330 - What the back-ground is in painting, in architecture is the real ground on which the building is erected ; and no architect took greater care than he that his work should not appear crude and hard : that is, it did not abruptly start out of the ground without expectation or preparation.
Page 368 - ... them in a superior manner did not always preserve, when they delineated individual nature. His portraits remind the spectator of the invention of history, and the amenity of landscape.
Page 24 - Turks' man of war tacked about, and we continued our course. But when your father saw it convenient to retreat, looking upon me, he blessed himself, and snatched me up in his arms, saying, ' Good God, that love can make this change !' and though he seemingly chid me, he would laugh at it as often as he remembered that voyage.
Page 66 - A fiery soul, which, working out its way, Fretted the pigmy body to decay, And o'er-informed the tenement of clay...
Page 51 - ... make a portrait of Proteus, or to define the figure of the fleeting air. Sometimes it lieth in pat allusion to a known story, or in seasonable application of a trivial saying, or in forging an apposite tale; sometimes it playeth in words and phrases, taking advantage from the ambiguity of their...
Page 53 - It raiseth admiration, as signifying a nimble sagacity of apprehension, a special felicity of invention, a vivacity of spirit, and reach of wit more than vulgar; it seeming to argue a rare quickness of parts, that one can fetch in remote conceits applicable; a notable skill, that he can dexterously accommodate them to the purpose before him; together with a lively briskness of humour, not apt to damp those sportful flashes of imagination.
Page 20 - ... if I would ask my husband privately, he would tell me what he found in the packet, and I might tell her. I, that was young and innocent, and to that day had never in my mouth
Page 23 - ... which would make the Turks think we were a man-of-war, but if they saw women they would take us for merchants and board us. He went upon...
Page 328 - Vanbrugh , and is a good example of his heavy though imposing style (*Lie heavy on him, Earth, for he Laid many a heavy load on thee"), with a Corinthian portico in the centre and two projecting wings.
Page 52 - ... from a lucky hitting upon what is strange, sometimes from a crafty wresting obvious matter to the purpose; often it consisteth in one knows not what and springeth up one can hardly tell how. Its ways are unaccountable and inexplicable, being answerable to the numberless rovings of fancy and windings of language.

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