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BELGIUM, GERMANY, SWITZERLAND, SAVOY,

AND FRANCE;

INCLUDING HISTORICAL NOTICES;

AND

STATEMENTS RELATIVE TO THE EXISTING ASPECT OF THE

PROTESTANT RELIGION IN THOSE COUNTRIES.

BY JOHN HOPPUS, M. A.

PROFESSOR OF THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE HUMAN MIND, AND LOGIC;

IN THE UNIVERSITY OF LONDON,

NEW YORK:
..** THEODORE FOSTER,
BASEMENT ROOMS, CORNER OF PINE-STREET AND BROADWAY.

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Georg. 4306.35.15

KARVARD COLLEGE

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IBRARY

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ADVERTISEMENT TO THE AMERICAN EDITION.

The author of this work, in his introduction, has thought it necessary to use a little of that literary coquetry, which is thought to give an air of modesty to the writer. He ought not to have dono so; for whether his public duties in society be considered, or the direction in which his travels have been pursued, it must be manifest that there is a wide field for investigation. It is true that a journey through Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, and France, necessarily includes a course in which the most dense of European population, the most striking of European events, the most important of European revolutions, and the most profound depths of European learning and science, have place; and that, consequently, they are visited by myriads of strangers and described under innumerable aspects.

Yet, on these very accounts a new work from the pen of one whose public functions embrace the consideration of the philosophy of the human mind," is one to be caught at with avidity and examined with care. From such a writer, the public expect investigations of a more profound and important nature than those which occupy the commonplace book of an ordinary journalist; they believe that he will look beneath the surfaces of things, and that whilst he describes passing events and actual scenes, he traces back to their causes, he proceeds forwards in their consequences, and suggests useful reflection. This has been the case with many before the author of this book; but it is remarkable that, of the thousand who thus occupy themselves, it is very rare that any two make the same kind of inquiries their chief object, consequently there is always something new, and generally something useful in all the various works of this nature.

The most prominent feature of this book is the regard which the author has paid to the customs, belief, and superstitions, of those who live in Catholic countries. He has marked with great minuteness all that was found to transgress his notions of reasonable devotion, and has been sedulous in exposing the cruelties and persecutions which, under the name of piety and love of the true faith, have been poured upon the heads of the "refractory and obstinate.” He has been desirous of calling general attention to these things, in the conviction that a cool and unbiassed survey would awaken men's minds to a sense of religious truth, and be an effectual check to bigotry. And this, the

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ADVERTISEMENT TO THE AMERICAN EDITION.

The author of this work, in his introduction, has thought it necessary to use a little of that literary coquetry, which is thought to give an air of modesty to the writer. He ought not to have done so; for whether his public duties in society be considered, or the direction in which his travels have been pursued, it must be manifest that there is a wide field for investigation. It is true that a journey through Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, and France, necessarily includes a course in which the most dense of European population, the most striking of European events, the most important of European revolutions, and the most profound depths of European learning and science, have place; and that, consequently, they are visited by myriads of strangers and described under innumerable aspects.

Yet, on these very accounts a new work from the pen of one whose public functions embrace the consideration of “the philosophy of the human mind," is one to be caught at with avidity and examined with care. From such a writer, the public expect investigations of a more profound and important nature than those which occupy the commonplace book of an ordinary journalist; they believe that he will look beneath the surfaces of things, and that whilst he describes passing events and actual scenes, he traces back to their causes, he proceeds forwards in their consequences, and suggests useful reflection. This has been the case with many before the author of this book; but it is remarkable that, of the thousand who thus occupy themselves, it is very rare that any two make the same kind of inquiries their chief object, consequently there is always something new, and generally something useful in all the various works of this nature.

The most prominent feature of this book is the regard which the author has paid to the customs, belief, and superstitions, of those who live in Catholic countries. He has marked with great minuteness all that was found to transgress his notions of reasonable devotion, and has been sedulous in exposing the cruelties and persecutions which, under the name of piety and love of the true faith, have been poured upon the heads of the 6 refractory and obstinate." He has been de. sirous of calling general attention to these things, in the conviction that a cool and unbiassed survey would awaken men's minds to a sense of religious truth, and be an effectual check to bigotry. And this, the

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