Art Principles with Special Reference to Painting: Together with Notes on the Illusions Produced by the Painter

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1919 - Aesthetics - 379 pages
 

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Page 301 - Blest as th" immortal gods is he, The youth who fondly sits by thee, And hears and sees thee all the while Softly speak and sweetly smile. 'Twas this deprived my soul of rest, And raised such tumults in my breast ; For while I gazed, in transport tost, My breath was gone, my voice was lost : III.
Page 282 - You must have no dependence on your own genius. If you have great talents, industry will improve them; if you have but moderate abilities, industry will supply their deficiency. Nothing is denied to well-directed labour: nothing is to be obtained without it.
Page 282 - The poorest of men, as he observed himself, did not labour from necessity more than he did from choice. Indeed, from all the circumstances related of his life, he appears not to have had the least conception that his art was to be acquired by any other means than great labour ; and yet he, of all men that ever lived, might make the greatest pretensions to the efficacy of native genius and inspiration.
Page 303 - I viewed them again and again ; I even affected to feel their merit and admire them more than I really did. In a short time, a new taste and a new. perception began to dawn upon me, and I was convinced that I had originally formed a false opinion of the perfection of art...
Page 301 - O'er my dim eyes a darkness hung ; My ears with hollow murmurs rung. IV. In dewy damps my limbs were chill'd ; My blood with gentle horrors thrill'd ; My feeble pulse forgot to play ; I fainted, sunk, and died away.
Page 275 - Art is a human activity, consisting in this, that one man consciously, by means of certain external signs, hands on to others feelings he has lived through, and that other people are infected by these feelings, and also experience them.
Page 351 - He could not for some time account for this circumstance; but when he recollected, that when he first saw them, he had his note-book in his hand, for the purpose of writing down short remarks, he perceived what had occasioned their now making a less impression in this respect than they had done formerly.. By the eye passing immediately from the white paper to the picture, the colours derived uncommon richness and warmth.. For want of this foil, they afterwards appeared comparatively cold.
Page 301 - Twas this deprived my soul of rest, And raised such tumults in my breast; For while I gazed, in transport tost, My breath was gone, my voice was lost. "My bosom glowed; the subtle flame Ran quick through all my vital frame; O'er my dim eyes a darkness hung; My ears with hollow murmurs rung. "In dewy damps my limbs were chilled; My blood with gentle horrors thrilled; My feeble pulse forgot to play, I fainted, sunk, and died away.
Page 282 - If you have great talents, industry will improve them; if you have but moderate abilities, industry will supply their deficiency. Nothing is denied to well-directed labour: nothing is to be obtained without it. Not to enter into metaphysical discussions on the nature or essence of genius, I will venture to assert that assiduity unabated by difficulty, and a disposition eagerly directed to the object of its pursuit, will produce effects similar to those which some call the result of natural powers.
Page 317 - The vulgar readily imagine that what they consider ugly in existence is not fit subject for the artist. They would like to forbid us to represent what displeases and offends them in nature. " It is a great error on their part. "What is commonly called ugliness in nature can in art become full of great beauty.

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