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BOOK I.

CHAP. VII.

OF THE VALUATION, PURCHASE, AND TRANSFER OF

Of Mines, Quarries, Pits, and Metalliferous

LANDED PROPERTY.

Bodies

624

CHAP. I.

Cuap. VIII.

The different Kinds and Tenures of Landed

Establishment of Fisheries

551

Property in the British Isles

629

I. Marine Fisheries

629

1. The Kinds of Landed Property, and its dif-

ferent Tenures, in England

II. River, Lake, and other Inland Fisheries 630

II. The Kinds and Tenures of Landed Pro-

CHAP. IX.

perty in Scotland

552

III. The Kinds and Tenures of Landed Pro-

Plantations and Woodlands

633

perty in Ireland

552

I. Soils and Situations which may be most pro-

fitably employed in Timber Plantations 633

CHAP. II.

II, Trees suitable for different Soils, Situations,

and Climates

Valuation of Landed Property

- 553

III. Forming Plantations

636

IV. Mixture of Trees in Plantations

CHAP. III.

V. Culture of Plantations

645

Purchase or Transfer of Landed Property 557 1. General Influence of Culture on Trees 615

2. Culture of the Soil among Trees

647

BOOK II.

3. Filling up of Blanks or Failures in Plant-

ations

648

OF THE LAYING OUT, OR GENERAL ARRANGEMENT,

4. Pruning and Heading down Trees in

Plantations

OF LANDED ESTATES.

5. Thinning young Plantations

CHAP. I.

VI. Improvement of Neglected Plantations 654

VU. Treatment of Injured and Diseased Trees 655

Consolidated detached Property

- 559 | V!ii. Products of Trees, and their Preparation

for Use or Sale

CHAP. II.

IX. Estimating the Value of Plantations and

Appropriating Commonable Lands

560 their Products, and exposing them to

1. Origin and different kinds of Commonable

Sale

Lands

II. General Principles of Appropriating and

CHAP. X.

dividing Commonable Lands

562

Formation and Management of Orchards

I. Soils and Situations most suitable for Or.

CHAP. III.

chards

Choice of the Demesne or Site for the Proprie. 11. Sorts of Trees and Manner of Planting

. 665

tor's Residence

565 III. Cultivation of Farm Orchards

IV. Gathering and Keeping of Orchard Fruit - 671

CHAP. IV.

V. Manufacture of Cider and Perry

671

Formation and Management of Roads

567

VI. Machinery and Utensils necessary for

1. Different kinds of Roads

Cider-making

568

675

II. Line of Direction, or laying out of Roads , 570
III. Form and Materials of Roads

- 574

CHAP, XL.

1. Formation of Roads, and of their Wear Laying out of Farm and other Culturable

or Injury

574 Lands

- 676

2. M'Adam's Theory and Practice of Road- 1. Extent or Size of Farm and Cottage Lands 677

making

576 11. Laying out Farms and Farmeries

. 677

3. Road-making, as treated of and practised 1. Situation and Arrangement of the Farmery 677

by various eminent Engineers and Sur. 2. Laying out Cottages

veyors

579 3. Laying out the Farm Lands

687

IV. Paved Roads

. 597

V. Milestones, Guide-posts, and Toll gates

VI. Preservation and Repair of Roads

BOOK III.

VII. Railroads

- 613

OF IMPROVING THE CULTURABLE LANDS OF AN

CHAP. V.

ESTATE,

Formation of Canals

. 616

1. Utility and Rise of Navigable Canals

. 616

CHAP. I.

11. Of discovering the most eligible Route for

a Line of Canal

Draining Watery Lands

III. Powers granted to Canal Companies by

I. Natural Causes of Wetness in Lands, and

the general Theory of Draining,

690

Government
IV. Execution of the Works

II. The Methods of Draining Boggy Land

- 619

III. Draining Hilly Lands

698

IV. Methods of draining Mixed Soils

CHAP. VI.

V. Methods of draining of Retentive Soils

Improvement of Estates by the Establishment of VI. Methods of draining Mines, Quarries, Pits,

Mills, Manufactories, Villages, Markets, &c. 692 Ponds, and Lakes

705

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VII. Formation of Drains, and Materials used

BOOK V.

706

VIIL. Of the implements peculiar to Draining 712 SELECTION, WIRING, AND STOCKING OF FARMS.

CHAP. IL

CHAP. I.

Page

Embanking and otherwise protecting Lands

Circumstances of a Farm necessary to be con.

from the Overflowing or Encroachment of

sidered by a proposed Tenant

771

Rivers of the Sea

1. Climate, in respect to farming Lands

I Embanking Lands from Rivers or the Sea . 713 II. Soil in respect to farming Lands

773

1 General Principles of designing Embank.

III. Subsoil relatively to the choice of a Farm 774

ments

714

IV. Elevation of Lands relatively to Farming - 775

2. Different Descriptions of Banks in general

V. Character of Surface in regard to farming

Use for excluding Waters

Lands

775

IL Guarding the Banks and otherwise improv.

VI. Aspect in regard to farming Lands 776

ing the Courses of Rivers and Streams

- 719 VII, Situation of Farm Lands in regard to

1. Guarding River Banks

719

Markets

2. Changing the Courses of Rivers, deepening

VIII. Extent of Land suitable for a Farm

. 777

their Beds, or raising their Waters to å

IX. Tenure on which Lands are held for Farm.

higher Level

ing

. 777

X. Rent

777

CHAP. JIL

XI. Taxes and other Burdens which affect the

Farmer

779

Irrigation, or the Improvement of Culturable

XII. Other Particulars requiring a Farmer's

Lands and Farmeries by the means of Water 792

I Irrigation, or the Preparation of the Surface

Attention, with a view to the Renting

of Land

779

of Lands for the profitable Application

of Water

1. Soils and Situations suitable for Watering 723

Chap. II.

2. Implements made Use of in Watering Considerations respecting Himself, which a

Lands; and the Terms of Art peculiar to Farmer ought to keep in view in selecting

such Operations

and hiring a Farm

780

3. Preparation of Surfaces for Irrigation :795 1. Personal Character and Expectations of a

IL Warping, or the Improvement of Land by

professional Farmer

muddy Water

- 730 II. Capital required by the Farmer

. 781

1. Irrigation of Arable Lands, and Subter-

raneous Irrigation

731

Chap. III.

III. Artificial Means of Procuring Water for

the Use of Live Stock

Choice of Stock for a Farm

732

789

I. Choice of Live Stock

782

1. Live Stock for the Purposes of Labour

CAAP. IV.

782

2. Choice of Live Stock for the Purposes of

Improvement of Lands lying Waste, so as to fit

breeding or feeding

them for Farm-Culture

739 II. Choice of Agricultural Implements, Seeds,

I Mountainous and hilly Grounds and their

and Plants

Improvement

740 III. Choice of Servants

II. Rocky or Stony Surfaces

740

III. Improving Woody Wastes or Wealds 742

CAAP. IV.

IV. Moors and their Improvements

. 743

V. Peat Mosses, Bogs, and Morasses, and their General Management of a Farm

789

Improvement

- 744 I. Keeping Accounts

. 789

VL Marches and their Improvement 747 II. Management of Servants

VIL Downs and other Shore Lands

- 748 III. Arrangement of Farm Labour

. 796

IV. Domestic Management and personal Ex-

CHAP. V.

penses

Improvement of Lands already in a State of

Culture

I General Principles and Modes of Procedure,

BOOK VI.

in improving Estates already more or less

CULTURE OF FARM LANDS.

improved

750

II. Improvement of Farmeries and Farm

CHAP. I.

Lands

750

General Processes common to Farm lands 798

CHAP. VI,

I. Rotation of Crops suitable to different De.

Execution of Improvements

798

scriptions of Soils

756

1. Different Modes of procuring the Execution

11. The working of Fallows

. 800

756

III. General Management of Manures

- 803

11. General Cautions on the subject of Esecut-

1. Management of Farm-yard Dung . 80+

ing Improvements

- 757

. Lime, and its Management as a Manure 805

IV. Composts and other Manures

807

BOOK IV.

CHAP. II.

MANAGEMENT OF LANDED PROPERTY.

Culture of the Cereal Grasses

1. Wheat

. 811

CHAP. I.

II. Rye

- 821

Superintendents, or Executive Establishment of

III. Barley

822

an Estate

IV. The Oat

826

Steward or Manager of an Estate, and his V. Cereal Grasses cultivated in Europe, some

Assistants

759

of which might be tried in Britain

828

II. Land Steward's Place of Business, and what 1. Maize, or Indian Corn

829

belongs to it

2. Canary Corn

832

3. The Millets

CHAP. II.

4 Rice, and some other Cereal Gramina 8S4

Duties of Managers of Estates

762

1. General Principles of Business considered

CHAP. III.

Relatively to Land Stewardship 763 Culture of Leguminous Field-Plants, the Seeds

11. Management of Tenants

763 of which are used

as Food for Man or

1. Proper Treatment of Tenants

763 Cattle

834

2. Business of letting Farms

. 764 1. The Pea

835

3 Different Species of Tenancy

764 11. The Bean

4. Rent and Covenants of a Lease

III. The Tare

841

5. Receiving Rents

IV, Various Legumes which might be culti-

JIL Keeping and Auditing Accounts

vated in British Farining

843

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- 867

• 962

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CHAP. IV.

Plants cultivated for their Roots or Leaves in

BOOK VII.

a recent State as Food for Man or Cattle 84

I. The Potato

815

THE ECONOMY OF LIVE STOCK AND THE DAIRY.

II. The Turnip

. 854

III. The Carrot

CHAP. I.

. 862

Page

IV. The Parsnep

The cultivated Horse

.865

V. The Field Beet

I. Varieties of the Horse

• 950

VI. The Cabbage Tribe

II. Organology or exterior Anatomy of the

VII. Other Plants which night be cultivated

Horse

955

in the Felds for their Roots or Leaves, as

III. The Bony Anatomy or Osseous Structure

Food for Man or Cattle, in a recent State 869

of the Horse

1. Osseous Structure of the Head

962

CHAP. V.

2. Bony Anatomy of the Trunk

- 964

3. Bony Anatomy of the Extremities

. 961

Culture of Herbage Plants

871 4. General Functions of the Bony Skeleton - 966

J. The Clover Family

- 871 IV. Anatomy and Physiology of the soft Parts 966

II. Lucern

1. Appendages to Bone, the Muscles, and

III. Saintfoin

- 880

Tendons

960

IV. Various Plants which are or may be culti.

2. Blood vessels of the Horse

967

vated as Herbage and for Hay

3. Absorbents of the Horse

903

4. Nerves and Glands of the Horse

CHAP. VI.

5. Integuments of the Horse's Body

Cultivated Grasses

6. The Head generally

1. Tall-growing or Hay Grasses

7. The Ear

.969

1. Tall or Hay Grasses of temporary Dura-

8. The Eye and its Appendages

- 970

tion

9. The Nose and Sense of Smelling

887

• 971

2. Tall or Hay Grasses of permanent Dura-

10. The Cavity of the Mouth

tion

11. The Neck

. 972

II. Grasses chiefly adapted for Pasturage

12. The Thorax or Chest

893

III. General View of the Produce, Uses, Cha-

13. The Abdoinen

. 973

14. The Fatal Colt

racter, and Value of the principal Bri.

. 973

15. The Foot

tish Grasses, according to the Result of

John Duke of Bedford's Experiments at

V. Diseases of the Horse

977

Woburn

1. General Remarks on the Healthy and

diseased State of the Horse

977

CHAP. VII.

2. Inflammatory Diseases of the Horse 978

3. Diseases of the Head

-979

Minagement of Lands permanently under

4. Diseases of the Neck

99)

Grass

901 5. The Chest

980

1. Perennial Grass Lands fit for mowing, or

6. Diseases of the Skin

984

Meadow Lands

901

7. Glanders and Farcy

II. Permanent Pastures

8. Diseases of the Extremities

985

1. Rich or feeding Pastures

. 905

9. Diseases of the Feet

. 997

2. Hilly and Mountainous Pastures - 908 VI. Veterinary Operations

. 999

III. Improvement of Grass Lands, by a tem-

1. Treatment of Wounds

porary Conversion to Tillage

909 2. Balls and Drinks

1. Grass Lands that ought not to be broken 3. Fomentations and Poultices

- 989

up by the Plough

909 4. Setons and Rowels

- 990

. Advantages and Disadvantages of break. 5. Blistering and Firing

9.90

ing up Grass Lands

6. Clystering and Physicking

- 90

3. Breaking up Grass Lands, and afterwards 7. Castration, Nicking, Docking, &c.

- 991

restoring them to Grass

8. Bleeding

VII. Veterinary Pharmacopæia

- 991

CHAP. VIII.

VIII. Shoeing of Horses

Plants cultivated on a limited Scale for various

IX. Criteria of the Qualities of Horses for

Arts and Manufactures

various Purposes

995

912

1. Plants grown chiefly for the Clothing Arts - 912

X. Breeding of Horses

997

1. Flax

XI. Rearing of Horses

999

XII. Training of Horses

2. Hemp

1000
- 917

3. The Fuller's Thistle, or Teasel

XIII. The Art of Horsemanship

1003

4. Madder

XIV. Feeding of Horses

100+

5. Woad

XV. Stabling and Grooming of Horses

1006

6. Weld, or Dyer's Weed

XVI. Management and Working of Horses - 1007

. 921

1. Management and Working of Race

7. Bastard Saffron

Horses

8. Various Plants which have been proposed

1007

as Substitutes for the Thread and dyeing

2. Management and Working of the Hunter 1009

3. Working and Management of Riding

Plants grown in Britain

923

Horses

II. Plants cultivated for the Brewery and Dis-

1009

4 Horses in Curricles and Coaches

tillery

923

1010

1. The Hop

5. Working of Cart, Waggon, and Farm

. 924

Horses

2. Culture of the Coriander and Caraway - 930

1010

3. Plants which may be substituted for

CHAP. II.

Brewery and Distillery Plants

III. Oil Plants

The Ass

• 1012

IV. Plants used in Domestic Economy

1. Mustard

933

CHAP. III.

2 Buck-wheat

934 The Mule and Hinny, Hybrids of the Horse

3. Tobacco

936

and Ass

4. Other Plants used in Domestic Economy,

which are or may be cultivated in the

CHAP. IV.

Fields

942

V. Plants which are are or may be grown in

Neat or Horned Cattle

. 101

the Fields for Medicinal Purposes

1. The Ox

943

. 1014.

1. Varieties and Breeds of the Bull

- 1014

2. Criteria of Cattle for various Objects and

CITAP. IX.

Purposes

- 1019

Marine Plants used in Agriculture

945 3. Breeding of Horned Cattle

1020

4. Rearing of Horned Cattle

CHAP. X.

5. Fattening Calves by Suckling

1023

6. Fattening Horned 'Cattle

1024

Weeds or Plants injurious to those cultivated 7. Management of Cows kept for the

in Agriculture

947

Dairy

1025

. 989
• 989

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& Working of Horned Cattle

Page

1029 III. Fattening of Swine

. 100

9. Anatomy and Physiology of the Bull and IV. Curing of Pork and Bacon

1070

Cos

- 1031 V. Diseases of Swine

10 Diseases of Horned Cattle

. 1071

1032

IL The Buffalo

- 1035

CUAP. VIII.

CHAP. V.

of the Goat, Rabbit, Hare, Dormouse, Deer,

The Dairy and its Management

and various other Animals, that are or may

I Chemical Principles of Milk, and the Proper.

be subjected to British Agriculture

. 1071

ties of the Milk of different Animals 1036

IL The Dairy House, its Furniture and Uten-

Chap. IX.

1057 Animals of the Bird Kind employed in Agri-

IIL Milking and the general Management of

culture

10SS

1040 1. Poultry Houses and their Furniture and

IV. Maling and Curing of Butter

- 1041

Utensils

. 1083

V. Process of Cheese-raking

1013

IL Gallinaceous Fowls, their Kinds, Breeding,

VI. Catalogue of the different sorts of Cheeses

Rearing, and Management

and other Preparations made from Milk 1045 III. Anserine or Aquatic Fowls

. 101
IV. Diseases of Poultry

11.95

CHAP. VI.

V. Birds of Luxury which are or may be cul.

The Sheep

tivated by Farmers

1 Varieties of Sheep

1049

IL Criteria of Properties in Sheep

. 1052

Chap. X.

IIL Breeding of Sheep

1053 Fish and Amphibious Animals subjected to

IV, Rearing and general Management of

Cultivation

. 1100

Sheep

1055

1. Reaning and Management of Sheep on

CHAP. XI.

rich grass and arable Lands

1056

2 Rearing and general Management of

Insects and Worms which are or may be sub-

Sheep on Hilly and Mountainous Dis- jected to Culture

. 1104

tricts, or what is generally termed Store

Sheep Husbandry

1058

Chap. XII.

V. Folding of Sheep

1061 Animals noxious to Agriculture

VI. of Fattening Sheep and Lambs

1062

1. Noxious Mammalia

- 1108

VIL Probable Improvement to be derived II. Birds injurious to Agriculture

. 1112

from Crosses of the Merino Breed of

III. Insects injurious to Agriculture . 1112

Sheep

VIII. Anatomy and Physiology of Sheep

1. Physiology of Insects

. 1112

. 1064

IX. Diseases of Sheep

2 Arrangement or Classification of Insects 1113

1061

3. Insects injurious to live Stock

. 1114

4. Insects injurious to Vegetables

. 1115

CHAP. VII.

5. Insects injurious to Food, Clothing, &c. 1118

The Swine

1067 6. Operations for subduing insects

1119

1 Varieties of the Common

Hog

1068 IV, Worm-like Animals injurious to Agri.

II. Breeding and Rearing of Swine

1069

culture

1120

- 1108

. 1063

STATISTICS OF BRITISH AGRICULTURE.

BOOK I.

2. Bibliography of German Agriculture

. 1210

3. Bibliography of Italian Agriculture . 1221

THE PRESENT STATE OF AGRICULTURE IN THE

4. Bibliography of the Agriculture of other

Countries of Europe

. 1222

BRITISH ISLES.

5. Agricultural Bibliography of North Ame.

CHAP. I.

rica

Different Descriptions of Men engaged in the

Practice or Pursuit of Agriculture

CHAP. V.

1121

1. Operators, or serving Agriculturists

1121

Professional Police and Public Laws relative

Il Commercial Agriculturists

- 1122 to Agriculturists and Agriculture

• 1223

III, Agricultural Counsellors, Artists, or

Professors

IV. Patrons of Agriculture

1123

BOOK II.

CHAP. II.

OF THE FUTURE PROGRESS OF AGRICULTURE IN

Different kinds of Farms in Britain relatively

BRITAIN

to the different Classes of Society who are

the Occupiers

• 1124

CUAP. I.

Improvement of Agriculture, by refining the

CHAP. III.

Taste of the Purchasers of its Products, and

Topographical Survey of the British Isles in creasing the Knowledge of Agricultural

respect to Agriculture

1125 Patrons

1. Agricultural Survey of England

1125

II. Agricultural Survey of Wales

1173

CHAP. II.

III. Agricultural Survey of Scotland

IV. Agricultural Survey of Ireland

1178 Improvement of Agriculture, by the better

1198 Education of those who are engaged in it as

a Profession

CHAP. IV.

1. Degree of Knowledge which may be at.

Literature and Bibliogaphy of Agriculture

1206 tained by Practical Men, and general Powers

1. Bibliography of British Agriculture

- 1206

of the human Mind as to Attainments 1926

Il Bibliography of Agriculture in Foreign

II. Professional Education of Agriculturists - 1228

Countries

1214 III. Conduct and Economy of an Agricul.

1. Bibliography of French Agriculture

. 1214

turist's Life

1299

Calendarial Index

1293

Glossarial Index

1241

General Index

1248

LIST OF ENGRAVINGS,

ARRANGED ACCORDING TO THE SUBJECTS.

Those marked + are chiefly of historical interest; those marked * are considered the best of their kind.

No.

Picks and Mattocks. 2 Primeval pick of Egypt 25 † Pick of the ancient Britons 124 + Picks or Pick hoes of Java 450 * The planter's foot-pick 590 6 * The planting-mattock 590 c * The planter's adze 1115 a, b Grubbing-mattocks of Devonshire

Spades. 14 | The Roman spade 155 | The Bushman's spade 1136 The caschrom or Highland spade 210 The Flemish spade 211 * The turf spade 661 * Draining-spades 679, 680 * Irrigating-spades 4696 * The hedger's spade 655 a The semicylindrical draining-spade

Page No.

Page Dibbles. 5 91 The Swedish dibbling-board

112 38 224 * The double corn-dibble

372 152 481

Scythes. 6+1 651 21 | Italian scythe and scythe stone of the 1170 middle ages

33 25 † 26

nes of the Ancient Britons 38 49 The Brabant cradle scythe

69 24 61 The great Brabant scythe

83 182 60 • The Hainault scythe

83 1197 225 * The improved Hainault scythe

379 369 226 * The improved cradle scythe

373 369 712

Reaping-hooks. 725

6 The reaping-hook of Egypt 485

7 25 + 27 + Ancient British reaping-hooks 38 710 121 i The reaping-hook of Ceylon

149 125 a, b + Reaping-hooks of Java

152 227 * The improved reaping-hook

373 481 712

Boring Instruments. 705

228 # The stack-borer 1170

373 712

238 * 239 * 240* Good's improved well-borers 377, 378 725 241 * Busby's quicksand borer

$78 242 * The peat borer

378 662 The common draining-borer

712 663 The horizontal boring-machine

713 38 708 * The root borer for risting roots by gun725 powder

744 856 704–707 Stone borers, or jumpers for blasting 596 stones

743

Shovels and Scoops. 459. The ditcher's shovel 661 d * The drainer's shovel 680 a, l* Irrigation shovels 1115 c The Devonshire paring-shovel 661 a, b, c* Draining-scoops 680 * The irrigator's scoop

Forks. 25, 26, 27 + Forks of the Ancient Britons 682 c * The irrigator's fork 753 * Forks for spreading dung 548 * The road-maker's fork

Drags or Hacks, and Pronged Hoes. 752 * A light dung drag 756 * A turnip-hook, or pronged hoe 215 * A three-pronged double hoe 282 * The pronged hoe and turnip chopper

856 859 370 386

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Hedge-bills and Pruning-ares, and ground Knives.

36 + The pruning-hook of the middle ages 53 121 at The jungle-hook of Ceylon

149 121 b † The pruning-axe of Ceylon

149 125 c to g + The pruning-hooks of Java 152 229 a * The Berwickshire hedge-bill or hedgescimitar

374 999 c* The bill-hook

374 229 d * The dressing-hook

S7+ 229 e * The lopping-hook

374 999 6 * The hedge axe

374 469 d * The hedge switching.bill

485 469 e Stephens's hedge-cutting bill

485 469 f * Stephens's hedge-axe

485 661 * The drainer's sod knife

712 681 The turf knife

795 682 a * The water scythe

725 682 6 * The water-hook

725

149 152 370 371 485

. 371

Hocs. 121 ct The hoe of Ceylon 124 b, ct The hoes of Java 215 * The double hoc, with a pronged blade 216 Ducket's hoes 469 a The common Dutch hoe 217 • The improved Dutch hoe 218 * Knight's improved thrust-hoe 219 * The Spanish draw-hoe 513 The Dutch wheel hoe 590 d * Sang's plantation-hoe 760 * The best turnip hand-hoe

Weeding Implements. 220 * Baker's thistle-extirpator 221 a * The Scotch thistle-drawers 221 6 * The Havre weeding-pincers

371 371 509 617 858

Level Instruments. 234 The common road-level 933 * Parker's level 235 a * The American level 235 6 * The square level 235 c * The object staff 235 d to h * The levelling staff 519 * Telford's road-level 677 a * Brown's irrigator's portable level 678 * The compass-level

Hand-Hummelling Implements. 405 • The hummelling.roller 406 The hummelling-beater

375 375 576 376 S76 376 596 725 795

371 371 371

Rope-twisters. 223 The improved twisting-crook :

372 372

410 440

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