Memoirs of Horace Walpole and His Contemporaries: Including Numerous Original Letters, Chiefly from Strawberry Hill, Volume 1

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Eliot Warburton
H. Colburn, 1852
 

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Page 65 - A stranger yet to pain! I feel the gales that from ye blow A momentary bliss bestow, As waving fresh their gladsome wing My weary soul they seem to soothe, And, redolent of joy and youth, To breathe a second spring.
Page 360 - Their idols are silver and gold, the work of men's hands. They have mouths, but they speak not : eyes have they, but they see not...
Page 260 - As, though the pride of Middleton and Bland, All boys may read and girls may understand! Then might I sing without the least offence, And all I sung should be the nation's sense,* Or teach the melancholy muse to mourn, Hang the sad verse on Carolina's urn, And hail her passage to the realms of rest. All parts performed, and all her children bless'd, So — satire is no more— I feel it die — No gazetteer more innocent than I, And let, a God's name!
Page 70 - I can't say I am sorry I was never quite a schoolboy : an expedition against bargemen, or a match at cricket, may be very pretty things to recollect ; but, thank my stars, I can remember things that are very near as pretty.
Page 182 - Lost or strayed out of this house, a man who has left a wife and six children on the parish ; whoever will give any tidings of him to the churchwardens of St. James's Parish, so as he may be got again, shall receive four shillings and sixpence reward. NB This reward will not be increased, nobody judging him to deserve a Crown.
Page 391 - Philosophers, and such folks, tell us, No great analogy between Greatness and happiness is seen. If then, as it might follow straight, Wretched to be, is to be great ; Forbid it, Gods, that you should try What 'tis to be so great as I...
Page 163 - ... one of the most useful as well as one of the most eminent traits in the human character.
Page 69 - Gainst graver hours that bring constraint To sweeten liberty : Some bold adventurers disdain The limits of their little reign, And unknown regions dare descry : Still as they run they look behind, They hear a voice in every wind, And snatch a fearful joy.
Page 69 - The limits of their little reign, And unknown regions dare descry ; Still as they run they look behind, They hear a voice in every wind, And snatch a fearful joy. Gay hope is theirs, by fancy fed, Less pleasing, when possest, ; The tear forgot as soon as shed, The sunshine of the breast...
Page 391 - WHILE at the helm of state you ride, Our nation's envy, and its pride ; While foreign courts with wonder gaze, And curse those councils which they praise ; Would you not wonder, sir, to view Your bard a greater man than you ? Which that he is you can not doubt, When you have read the sequel out.

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