Dwelling Places: Postwar Black British Writing

Front Cover
Manchester University Press, 2003 - Literary Criticism - 224 pages
Dwelling Places explores some of the key venues of black British literary and cultural production across the postwar period: bedsits and basements; streets and cafes; train stations and tourist landscapes; the suburbs and the city; the north and south. Extending from central London to the outskirts of Glasgow, the book pursues a "devolving" landscape in order to consider what an analysis of "dwelling" might contribute to the travelling theories of diaspora discourse. What happens, for example, when we "situate" literatures of movement and migration? There are fresh readings of work by some of the key literary figures of the postwar years, including Sam Selvon, George Lamming, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Farrukh Dhondy, Hanif Kureishi, Salman Rushdie, Meera Syal and Jackie Kay. These writings are explored alongside a range of non-literary material, including photography, painting and film, in order to consider their relation to broader shifts in the politics of black representation over the past fifty years. This book will appeal to students of British and postcolonial literature.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Dwelling places
21
The street
69
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)

James Procter is Lecturer in English Studies at the University of Stirling.

Bibliographic information