Shakespeare, Our Contemporary

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Jan 21, 2015 - Drama - 400 pages
Shakespeare, Our Contemporary is a provocative, original study of the major plays of Shakespeare. More than that, it is one of the few critical works to have strongly influenced theatrical productions.

Peter Brook and Charles Marowitz are among the many directors who have acknowledged their debt to Jan Kott, finding in his analogies between Shakespearean situations and those in modern life and drama the seeds of vital new stage conceptions. Shakespeare, Our Contemporary has been translated into nineteen languages since it appeared in 1961, and readers all over the world have similarly found their responses to Shakespeare broadened and enriched.
 

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User Review  - rubyjand - LibraryThing

Shakespeare Our Contemporary by Jan Kott. 1964. Read in March 2009. This book is one of the most important ever written about Shakespeare. First published in Polish in the 1960's it brought a ... Read full review

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Contents

Cover
KING LEAR OR ENDGAME
LET ROME IN TIBER MELT
PROSPEROS STAFF
TITANIA AND THE ASSS HEAD
SHAKESPEARECRUEL AND TRUE
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About the author (2015)

Jan Kott was a theater critic, scholar, and dramaturge. The author of Shakespeare, Our Contemporary, he was heavily influenced by Greek tragedy, the plays of modernists SI Witkiewicz and Slawomir Mrożek, as well as the theater of Tadeusz Kantor and Jerzy Grotwoski. Born in Warsaw in 1914, Kott was drafted in 1939 to serve in the Polish army in World War II. After teaching for some years at the University of Wroclaw and the University of Warsaw, he traveled to the United States on a Ford Foundation Scholarship in 1965. There he held visiting professorships at Yale, UC Berkeley, and Louvain. Rather than return to the political turmoil of Poland, he was granted asylum in the US, became a full-time professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and became an American citizen a decade later. He died in 2001.

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