The Commercialisation of English Society, 1000-1500

Front Cover
Manchester University Press, 1996 - Business & Economics - 281 pages
The commercialisation of English society was welcomed on its first publication as an up-to-date presentation of English medieval social history in which the developing role of money and commerce over five centuries is put into perspective alongside other features of change. It supplies evidence that the emerging commercial institutions and practices in medieval England had important long-term implications for economic development and welfare, and examines ways in which these affected the exercise of power by kings and lords. This is one of the most active areas of current medieval research, partly because such re-evaluation of the role of commercial development in the Middle Ages is substantially modifying earlier interpretations of the period. The book serves as a valuable introduction to a wide area of current research and debate. The second edition takes the opportunity to clarify some of the issues raised in recent discussion and to update the bibliography to include books and articles published since 1992. The book will be valuable to any student whose course includes a component of medieval social history, to professional historians working on medieval topics, to historical sociologists, and to general readers of history who enjoy seeing a broad sweep of social change carefully discussed and evaluated.
 

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Contents

10001180
14
Trade and specialisation
29
Lordship
53
Markets and rules
79
Trade and specialisation
102
Lordship
128
Markets and rules
155
Trade and specialisation
179
Lordship
204
Conclusions
228
Index
269
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