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THE

ENGLISH

JOURNAL OF EDUCATION:

SPECIALLY DESIGNED AS A

Medium of Correspondence

AMONG THE

HEADS OF TRAINING COL ES, PAROCHIAL CLERGYMEN, AND ALL
PROMOTERS OF SOUND EDUCATION, PARENTS, SPONSORS,
SCHOOLMASTERS, PUPIL TEACHERS, SUNDAY.

SCHOOL TEACHERS, ETC.

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LONDON:
GEORGE BELL, 186, FLEET STREET.

1850.

LONDON: STEVENS AND CO., PRINTERS, BELL YARD,

TEMPLE BAR

JOURNAL OF EDUCATION.

JANUARY, 1850.

BELGIUM AND ITS SCHOOLS.

TO THE EDITOR OF

THE ENGLISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATION.” Sir,—There is scarcely an English tourist to whom the name of Belgium is not familiar. He has been accustomed to make it the highway to Germany and Italy. The great national railroad, which is to Belgium what the river St. Lawrence is to Canada, has brought before his eyes every one of its cities in succession. He knows the outline of Antwerp cathedral tower. He is as familiar with the façades of Brussels as with those of London; and could probably draw from memory a more spirited sketch of LES HALLES at Bruges, or the HOTEL DE Ville at Louvain, than of Guildhall or the Mansion-house. He may, perhaps, have paused to wonder, where more perfunctory travellers have hurried on. He may have studied the magnificent house architecture of the middle ages, with which Flanders is enriched; or the various styles of wood-carving in the cathedrals; or the many battle-fields, from Courtray to Waterloo ; the prodigality of splendour which dazzles one in the gorgeous groups of Rubens, or the purer grace of Vandyke. He has probably thought of the days when Bruges was the centre of European commerce, a sort of Manchester and Liverpool in one; or later, when the Bourse at Antwerp was crowded with the most opulent merchants of Christendom. Accustomed to historical parallel, he may have mused over the possible decay of the great marts of England. He may have pondered, whether Bristol and Manchester, Glasgow and London, will leave more splendid relics for the admiration of posterity than these cities of the past; whether a traveller, in the twenty-fifth century of the Christian era, will find them still prosperous, or vainly struggling against decline, or already counted among the things that are gone, as we count of Saragossa, Novgorod, and Venice.

But has he gone further in his inquiries and reflections ? Has he entered at all into what we may call the PEOPLE OF Belgium questions? Has he thought, how does this population get a living? Where and how were they educated ? Is

VOL. VIII.-NO. I.

B

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