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" ... while it is supported by either parts or spirit, it will be seldom heartily abhorred. The Roman tyrant was content to be hated, if he was but feared; and there are thousands of the readers of romances willing to be thought wicked, if they may be allowed... "
Encyclopaedia Britannica; Or A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and ... - Page 77
1823
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Select British Classics, Volume 5

English literature - 1803
...romance* willing to be thought wicked, if they may be allowed to be wits. It is therefore to be steadily inculcated, that virtue is the highest proof of understanding,...: that it begins in mistake, and ends in ignominy. No. V. TUESDAY, APRIL 3, 17 SO. Et mine omnis ager, nunc omnis parturit arbos ; Nunc frondent sUvas,...
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The Beauties of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Consisting of Maxims and Observations ...

Samuel Johnson - 1804 - 394 pages
...are best served by poetSi orators, and historians. Ibid. It ought always to be steadily inculeated, that ' virtue is the highest proof of understanding,...; that it begins in mistake, and ends in ignominy. . - Rambler, vol. i, p. 14. The general rule of consulting the genius for particular offices in life...
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Morality of Fiction: Or, An Inquiry Into the Tendency of Fictitious ...

Hugh Murray - Electronic book - 1805 - 174 pages
...to be wits. It is therefore to be always inculcated, that virtue is the highest proof of a superior understanding, and the only solid basis of greatness...that it begins in mistake, and ends in ignominy.' Dr. Blair has also expressed an opinion of the utility which may be derived from this mode of writing,...
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Morality of Fiction: Or, An Inquiry Into the Tendency of Fictitious ...

Hugh Murray - Electronic book - 1805 - 174 pages
...is the highest proof of a superior understanding, and the only solid basis of greatness ; and thit vice is the natural consequence of narrow thoughts;...that it begins in mistake, and ends in ignominy.' Dr. Blair has also expressed an opinion of the utility which may be derived from this mode of writing,...
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The Rambler, by S. Johnson, Volume 1

1806
...romances willing to be thought wicked, if they may be allowed to be wits. It is therefore to be steadily inculcated, that virtue is the highest proof of understanding,...; that it begins in mistake, and ends in ignominy, N 5. TUESDAY, APRIL 3. 1750. ]Lt mine omnis ager, nunc omnis parturit arbos, Nuuc frondcnt silvce,...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

Samuel Johnson - English literature - 1806
...romances willing to be thought wicked, if they may be allowed to be wits. It is therefore to be steadily inculcated, that virtue is the highest proof of understanding,...of narrow thoughts ; that it begins in mistake, and end* in ignominy. N 5. TUESDAY, APRIL 3. 1750, Et mtne omnis ager, nunc omaiifarturit arbos, Nuae...
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Thaddeus of Warsaw, Volume 1

Jane Porter - Poland - 1806
...and engaging objects of rural nature ; and on these grounds I Lave attempted steadily to inculcate, " That virtue is the highest proof of understanding,...vice is the natural consequence of narrow thoughts ; which begin in mistake, and end in ignominy." THADDEUS OF WARSAW. CHAP. I. THE large and magnificent...
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Aphorisms of Sir Philip Sidney: With Remarks, Volume 1

Sir Philip Sidney - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1807
...of Dr. Johnson may well support the observation, and he. says, " that it ought always to be steadily inculcated, that virtue is the highest proof of understanding,...vice is the natural consequence of narrow thoughts, which begin in mistake and end in ignominy." 2. All honest hearts feel that trust goes beyond advancement....
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Aphorisms of Sir Philip Sidney: With Remarks, Volume 1

Sir Philip Sidney - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1807
...support the observation, and he says, " that it ought always to be steadily inculcated, that virtue is 1. the highest proof of understanding, and the only solid...vice is the natural consequence of narrow thoughts, which begin in mistake and end in ignominy." 2. All honest hearts feel that trust goes beyond advancement....
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The British Essayists, Volume 19

Alexander Chalmers - English essays - 1808
...romances willing to be thought wicked, if they may be allowed to be wits. It is therefore, to be steadily inculcated, that virtue is the highest proof of understanding,...; that it begins in mistake, and ends in ignominy. N 5. TUESDAY, APRILS, I/5O. Et nunc omnis ager, nunc omnis parturit nrl>os t Nuncfrondent silvee^...
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