The New Public Health: Discourses, Knowledges, Strategies

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SAGE, Dec 30, 1996 - Social Science - 192 pages
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Petersen and Lupton focus critically on the new public health, assessing its implications for the concepts of self, embodiment and citizenship. They argue that the new public health is used as a source of moral regulation and for distinguishing between self and other. They also explore the implications of modernist belief in the power of science and the ability of experts to solve problems through rational administrative means that underpin the strategies and rhetoric of the new public health.

 

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Contents

A New Morality?
1
Governing by Numbers
27
Chapter 3 The Healthy Citizen
61
Chapter 4 Risk Discourse and The Environment
89
Chapter 5 The Healthy City
120
Chapter 6 The Duty to Participate
146
Conclusion
174
References
182
Index
199
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About the author (1996)

Alan Petersen is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Murdoch University in Western Australia. His recent publications include The New Public Health: Health and Self in the Age of Risk (co-written with Deborah Lupton), Foucalut, Health and Medicine (co-edited with Robin Bunton) and Health Matters: Sociology of Illness, Prevention and Care (co-edited with Charles Waddell).

Deborah Lupton is an independent sociologist. She was formerly Professor of Sociology and Cultural Studies at Charles Sturt University, Australia.

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