The Student's Manual of Moral Philosophy

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Page 320 - For the invisible things of God from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead...
Page 360 - O, if this were seen, The happiest youth, viewing his progress through, What perils past, what crosses to ensue, Would shut the book and sit him down and die.
Page 132 - the doing good to mankind, in obedience to the will of God, and for the sake of everlasting happiness.
Page 220 - Calvinism presents, it cannot be denied that " such knowledge is too wonderful for us; it is high, we cannot attain unto it.
Page 173 - By motive, I mean the whole of that which moves, excites or invites the mind to volition, whether that be one thing singly, or many things conjunctly.
Page 110 - But whatsoever is the object of any man's appetite or desire, that is it which he for his part calleth 'good'; and the object of his hate and aversion, 'evil'; and of his contempt 'vile' and 'inconsiderable.' For these words of good, evil, and contemptible, are ever used with relation to the person that useth them, there being nothing simply and absolutely so; nor any common rule of good and evil, to be taken from the nature of the objects themselves...
Page 381 - A brute arrives at a point of perfection that he can never pass: in a few years he has all the endowments he is capable of; and were he to live ten thousand more, would be the same thing he is at present.
Page 223 - Bacon, that the words of prophecy are to be interpreted as the words of one 'with whom a thousand years are as one day, and one day as a thousand years.
Page 386 - ... according to the deeds done in the body, whether they have been good or evil.
Page 32 - But strew his ashes to the wind Whose sword or voice has served mankind, And is he dead, whose glorious mind Lifts thine on high ? To live in hearts we leave behind Is not to die.

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